Increasing work-time influence: consequences for flexibility, variability, regularity and predictability

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Standard

Increasing work-time influence : consequences for flexibility, variability, regularity and predictability. / Nabe-Nielsen, Kirsten; Garde, Anne Helene; Aust, Birgit; Diderichsen, Finn.

In: Contemporary Ergonomics, Vol. 55, No. 4, 03.2012, p. 440-449.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Nabe-Nielsen, K, Garde, AH, Aust, B & Diderichsen, F 2012, 'Increasing work-time influence: consequences for flexibility, variability, regularity and predictability', Contemporary Ergonomics, vol. 55, no. 4, pp. 440-449. https://doi.org/10.1080/00140139.2011.646321

APA

Nabe-Nielsen, K., Garde, A. H., Aust, B., & Diderichsen, F. (2012). Increasing work-time influence: consequences for flexibility, variability, regularity and predictability. Contemporary Ergonomics, 55(4), 440-449. https://doi.org/10.1080/00140139.2011.646321

Vancouver

Nabe-Nielsen K, Garde AH, Aust B, Diderichsen F. Increasing work-time influence: consequences for flexibility, variability, regularity and predictability. Contemporary Ergonomics. 2012 Mar;55(4):440-449. https://doi.org/10.1080/00140139.2011.646321

Author

Nabe-Nielsen, Kirsten ; Garde, Anne Helene ; Aust, Birgit ; Diderichsen, Finn. / Increasing work-time influence : consequences for flexibility, variability, regularity and predictability. In: Contemporary Ergonomics. 2012 ; Vol. 55, No. 4. pp. 440-449.

Bibtex

@article{0f16f714efc948c29995d020428ee16b,
title = "Increasing work-time influence: consequences for flexibility, variability, regularity and predictability",
abstract = "This quasi-experimental study investigated how an intervention aiming at increasing eldercare workers' influence on their working hours affected the flexibility, variability, regularity and predictability of the working hours. We used baseline (n = 296) and follow-up (n = 274) questionnaire data and interviews with intervention-group participants (n = 32). The work units in the intervention group designed their own intervention comprising either implementation of computerised self-scheduling (subgroup A), collection of information about the employees' work-time preferences by questionnaires (subgroup B), or discussion of working hours (subgroup C). Only computerised self-scheduling changed the working hours and the way they were planned. These changes implied more flexible but less regular working hours and an experience of less predictability and less continuity in the care of clients and in the co-operation with colleagues. In subgroup B and C, the participants ended up discussing the potential consequences of more work-time influence without actually implementing any changes. PRACTITIONER SUMMARY: Employee work-time influence may buffer the adverse effects of shift work. However, our intervention study suggested that while increasing the individual flexibility, increasing work-time influence may also result in decreased regularity of the working hours and less continuity in the care of clients and co-operation with colleagues.",
author = "Kirsten Nabe-Nielsen and Garde, {Anne Helene} and Birgit Aust and Finn Diderichsen",
year = "2012",
month = "3",
doi = "10.1080/00140139.2011.646321",
language = "English",
volume = "55",
pages = "440--449",
journal = "Contemporary Ergonomics and Human Factors",
issn = "0267-4718",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "4",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Increasing work-time influence

T2 - consequences for flexibility, variability, regularity and predictability

AU - Nabe-Nielsen, Kirsten

AU - Garde, Anne Helene

AU - Aust, Birgit

AU - Diderichsen, Finn

PY - 2012/3

Y1 - 2012/3

N2 - This quasi-experimental study investigated how an intervention aiming at increasing eldercare workers' influence on their working hours affected the flexibility, variability, regularity and predictability of the working hours. We used baseline (n = 296) and follow-up (n = 274) questionnaire data and interviews with intervention-group participants (n = 32). The work units in the intervention group designed their own intervention comprising either implementation of computerised self-scheduling (subgroup A), collection of information about the employees' work-time preferences by questionnaires (subgroup B), or discussion of working hours (subgroup C). Only computerised self-scheduling changed the working hours and the way they were planned. These changes implied more flexible but less regular working hours and an experience of less predictability and less continuity in the care of clients and in the co-operation with colleagues. In subgroup B and C, the participants ended up discussing the potential consequences of more work-time influence without actually implementing any changes. PRACTITIONER SUMMARY: Employee work-time influence may buffer the adverse effects of shift work. However, our intervention study suggested that while increasing the individual flexibility, increasing work-time influence may also result in decreased regularity of the working hours and less continuity in the care of clients and co-operation with colleagues.

AB - This quasi-experimental study investigated how an intervention aiming at increasing eldercare workers' influence on their working hours affected the flexibility, variability, regularity and predictability of the working hours. We used baseline (n = 296) and follow-up (n = 274) questionnaire data and interviews with intervention-group participants (n = 32). The work units in the intervention group designed their own intervention comprising either implementation of computerised self-scheduling (subgroup A), collection of information about the employees' work-time preferences by questionnaires (subgroup B), or discussion of working hours (subgroup C). Only computerised self-scheduling changed the working hours and the way they were planned. These changes implied more flexible but less regular working hours and an experience of less predictability and less continuity in the care of clients and in the co-operation with colleagues. In subgroup B and C, the participants ended up discussing the potential consequences of more work-time influence without actually implementing any changes. PRACTITIONER SUMMARY: Employee work-time influence may buffer the adverse effects of shift work. However, our intervention study suggested that while increasing the individual flexibility, increasing work-time influence may also result in decreased regularity of the working hours and less continuity in the care of clients and co-operation with colleagues.

U2 - 10.1080/00140139.2011.646321

DO - 10.1080/00140139.2011.646321

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 22423676

VL - 55

SP - 440

EP - 449

JO - Contemporary Ergonomics and Human Factors

JF - Contemporary Ergonomics and Human Factors

SN - 0267-4718

IS - 4

ER -

ID: 40343886