Placental passage of benzoic acid, caffeine, and glyphosate in an ex vivo human perfusion system

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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Placental passage of benzoic acid, caffeine, and glyphosate in an ex vivo human perfusion system. / Mose, Tina; Kjaerstad, Mia Birkhoej; Mathiesen, Line; Nielsen, Jesper Bo; Edelfors, Sven; Knudsen, Lisbeth E.

In: Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health. Part A: Current Issues, Vol. 71, No. 15, 2008, p. 984-91.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Mose, T, Kjaerstad, MB, Mathiesen, L, Nielsen, JB, Edelfors, S & Knudsen, LE 2008, 'Placental passage of benzoic acid, caffeine, and glyphosate in an ex vivo human perfusion system', Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health. Part A: Current Issues, vol. 71, no. 15, pp. 984-91. https://doi.org/10.1080/01932690801934513

APA

Mose, T., Kjaerstad, M. B., Mathiesen, L., Nielsen, J. B., Edelfors, S., & Knudsen, L. E. (2008). Placental passage of benzoic acid, caffeine, and glyphosate in an ex vivo human perfusion system. Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health. Part A: Current Issues, 71(15), 984-91. https://doi.org/10.1080/01932690801934513

Vancouver

Mose T, Kjaerstad MB, Mathiesen L, Nielsen JB, Edelfors S, Knudsen LE. Placental passage of benzoic acid, caffeine, and glyphosate in an ex vivo human perfusion system. Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health. Part A: Current Issues. 2008;71(15):984-91. https://doi.org/10.1080/01932690801934513

Author

Mose, Tina ; Kjaerstad, Mia Birkhoej ; Mathiesen, Line ; Nielsen, Jesper Bo ; Edelfors, Sven ; Knudsen, Lisbeth E. / Placental passage of benzoic acid, caffeine, and glyphosate in an ex vivo human perfusion system. In: Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health. Part A: Current Issues. 2008 ; Vol. 71, No. 15. pp. 984-91.

Bibtex

@article{565cb5fe3e5949389bde2969fb0e9328,
title = "Placental passage of benzoic acid, caffeine, and glyphosate in an ex vivo human perfusion system",
abstract = "Ex vivo perfusion of the human term placenta is a method to study placental transfer without extrapolation from animal to human and with no ethical concerns for mother and child. However, ex vivo placenta perfusion has a limited potential within chemical screening and testing as the method is time-consuming. This study was an attempt to construct data needed to develop quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models that are able to predict placental transfer of new compounds. Placental transfer is a biological activity that statistically may be related to the physiochemical properties of a given group of compounds. Benzoic acid, caffeine, and glyphosate were chosen as model compounds because they are small molecules with large differences in physiochemical properties. Caffeine crossed the placenta by passive diffusion. The initial transfer rate of benzoic acid was more limited in the first part of the perfusion compared to caffeine, but reached the same steady-state level by the end of perfusion. The transfer of glyphosate was restricted throughout perfusion, with a lower permeation rate, and only around 15{\%} glyphosate in maternal circulation crossed to the fetal circulation during the study period.",
keywords = "Adult, Benzoic Acid, Caffeine, Female, Glycine, Humans, In Vitro Techniques, Maternal-Fetal Exchange, Models, Biological, Perfusion, Placenta, Pregnancy, Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship",
author = "Tina Mose and Kjaerstad, {Mia Birkhoej} and Line Mathiesen and Nielsen, {Jesper Bo} and Sven Edelfors and Knudsen, {Lisbeth E.}",
year = "2008",
doi = "10.1080/01932690801934513",
language = "English",
volume = "71",
pages = "984--91",
journal = "Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health. Part A: Current Issues",
issn = "1528-7394",
publisher = "Taylor & Francis",
number = "15",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Placental passage of benzoic acid, caffeine, and glyphosate in an ex vivo human perfusion system

AU - Mose, Tina

AU - Kjaerstad, Mia Birkhoej

AU - Mathiesen, Line

AU - Nielsen, Jesper Bo

AU - Edelfors, Sven

AU - Knudsen, Lisbeth E.

PY - 2008

Y1 - 2008

N2 - Ex vivo perfusion of the human term placenta is a method to study placental transfer without extrapolation from animal to human and with no ethical concerns for mother and child. However, ex vivo placenta perfusion has a limited potential within chemical screening and testing as the method is time-consuming. This study was an attempt to construct data needed to develop quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models that are able to predict placental transfer of new compounds. Placental transfer is a biological activity that statistically may be related to the physiochemical properties of a given group of compounds. Benzoic acid, caffeine, and glyphosate were chosen as model compounds because they are small molecules with large differences in physiochemical properties. Caffeine crossed the placenta by passive diffusion. The initial transfer rate of benzoic acid was more limited in the first part of the perfusion compared to caffeine, but reached the same steady-state level by the end of perfusion. The transfer of glyphosate was restricted throughout perfusion, with a lower permeation rate, and only around 15% glyphosate in maternal circulation crossed to the fetal circulation during the study period.

AB - Ex vivo perfusion of the human term placenta is a method to study placental transfer without extrapolation from animal to human and with no ethical concerns for mother and child. However, ex vivo placenta perfusion has a limited potential within chemical screening and testing as the method is time-consuming. This study was an attempt to construct data needed to develop quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models that are able to predict placental transfer of new compounds. Placental transfer is a biological activity that statistically may be related to the physiochemical properties of a given group of compounds. Benzoic acid, caffeine, and glyphosate were chosen as model compounds because they are small molecules with large differences in physiochemical properties. Caffeine crossed the placenta by passive diffusion. The initial transfer rate of benzoic acid was more limited in the first part of the perfusion compared to caffeine, but reached the same steady-state level by the end of perfusion. The transfer of glyphosate was restricted throughout perfusion, with a lower permeation rate, and only around 15% glyphosate in maternal circulation crossed to the fetal circulation during the study period.

KW - Adult

KW - Benzoic Acid

KW - Caffeine

KW - Female

KW - Glycine

KW - Humans

KW - In Vitro Techniques

KW - Maternal-Fetal Exchange

KW - Models, Biological

KW - Perfusion

KW - Placenta

KW - Pregnancy

KW - Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship

U2 - 10.1080/01932690801934513

DO - 10.1080/01932690801934513

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 18569607

VL - 71

SP - 984

EP - 991

JO - Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health. Part A: Current Issues

JF - Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health. Part A: Current Issues

SN - 1528-7394

IS - 15

ER -

ID: 137758144