Racial-ethnic related clinical and neurocognitive differences in adults with gambling disorder

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Racial-ethnic related clinical and neurocognitive differences in adults with gambling disorder. / Chamberlain, Samuel R.; Leppink, Eric; Redden, Sarah A.; Odlaug, Brian L.; Grant, Jon E.

In: Psychiatry Research, Vol. 242, 30.08.2016, p. 82-87.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Chamberlain, SR, Leppink, E, Redden, SA, Odlaug, BL & Grant, JE 2016, 'Racial-ethnic related clinical and neurocognitive differences in adults with gambling disorder', Psychiatry Research, vol. 242, pp. 82-87. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.psychres.2016.05.038

APA

Chamberlain, S. R., Leppink, E., Redden, S. A., Odlaug, B. L., & Grant, J. E. (2016). Racial-ethnic related clinical and neurocognitive differences in adults with gambling disorder. Psychiatry Research, 242, 82-87. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.psychres.2016.05.038

Vancouver

Chamberlain SR, Leppink E, Redden SA, Odlaug BL, Grant JE. Racial-ethnic related clinical and neurocognitive differences in adults with gambling disorder. Psychiatry Research. 2016 Aug 30;242:82-87. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.psychres.2016.05.038

Author

Chamberlain, Samuel R. ; Leppink, Eric ; Redden, Sarah A. ; Odlaug, Brian L. ; Grant, Jon E. / Racial-ethnic related clinical and neurocognitive differences in adults with gambling disorder. In: Psychiatry Research. 2016 ; Vol. 242. pp. 82-87.

Bibtex

@article{ed40fee4d7ec4a1bade506c28ce26f36,
title = "Racial-ethnic related clinical and neurocognitive differences in adults with gambling disorder",
abstract = "Recent epidemiological data suggest that the lifetime prevalence of gambling problems differs depending on race-ethnicity. Understanding variations in disease presentation in blacks and whites, and relationships with biological and sociocultural factors, may have implications for selecting appropriate prevention strategies. 62 non-treatment seeking volunteers (18-29 years, n=18 [29.0{\%}] female) with gambling disorder were recruited from the general community. Black (n=36) and White (n=26) participants were compared on demographic, clinical and cognitive measures. Young black adults with gambling disorder reported more symptoms of gambling disorder and greater scores on a measure of compulsivity. In addition they exhibited significantly higher total errors on a set-shifting task, less risk adjustment on a gambling task, greater delay aversion on a gambling task, and more total errors on a working memory task. These findings suggest that the clinical and neurocognitive presentation of gambling disorder different between racial-ethnic groups.",
keywords = "Journal Article",
author = "Chamberlain, {Samuel R.} and Eric Leppink and Redden, {Sarah A.} and Odlaug, {Brian L.} and Grant, {Jon E.}",
note = "Copyright {\circledC} 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.",
year = "2016",
month = "8",
day = "30",
doi = "10.1016/j.psychres.2016.05.038",
language = "English",
volume = "242",
pages = "82--87",
journal = "Psychiatry Research",
issn = "0165-1781",
publisher = "Elsevier Ireland Ltd",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Racial-ethnic related clinical and neurocognitive differences in adults with gambling disorder

AU - Chamberlain, Samuel R.

AU - Leppink, Eric

AU - Redden, Sarah A.

AU - Odlaug, Brian L.

AU - Grant, Jon E.

N1 - Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

PY - 2016/8/30

Y1 - 2016/8/30

N2 - Recent epidemiological data suggest that the lifetime prevalence of gambling problems differs depending on race-ethnicity. Understanding variations in disease presentation in blacks and whites, and relationships with biological and sociocultural factors, may have implications for selecting appropriate prevention strategies. 62 non-treatment seeking volunteers (18-29 years, n=18 [29.0%] female) with gambling disorder were recruited from the general community. Black (n=36) and White (n=26) participants were compared on demographic, clinical and cognitive measures. Young black adults with gambling disorder reported more symptoms of gambling disorder and greater scores on a measure of compulsivity. In addition they exhibited significantly higher total errors on a set-shifting task, less risk adjustment on a gambling task, greater delay aversion on a gambling task, and more total errors on a working memory task. These findings suggest that the clinical and neurocognitive presentation of gambling disorder different between racial-ethnic groups.

AB - Recent epidemiological data suggest that the lifetime prevalence of gambling problems differs depending on race-ethnicity. Understanding variations in disease presentation in blacks and whites, and relationships with biological and sociocultural factors, may have implications for selecting appropriate prevention strategies. 62 non-treatment seeking volunteers (18-29 years, n=18 [29.0%] female) with gambling disorder were recruited from the general community. Black (n=36) and White (n=26) participants were compared on demographic, clinical and cognitive measures. Young black adults with gambling disorder reported more symptoms of gambling disorder and greater scores on a measure of compulsivity. In addition they exhibited significantly higher total errors on a set-shifting task, less risk adjustment on a gambling task, greater delay aversion on a gambling task, and more total errors on a working memory task. These findings suggest that the clinical and neurocognitive presentation of gambling disorder different between racial-ethnic groups.

KW - Journal Article

U2 - 10.1016/j.psychres.2016.05.038

DO - 10.1016/j.psychres.2016.05.038

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 27262266

VL - 242

SP - 82

EP - 87

JO - Psychiatry Research

JF - Psychiatry Research

SN - 0165-1781

ER -

ID: 166496079