Replacing Red Meat with Other Nonmeat Food Sources of Protein is Associated with a Reduced Risk of Type 2 Diabetes in a Danish Cohort of Middle-Aged Adults

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Standard

Replacing Red Meat with Other Nonmeat Food Sources of Protein is Associated with a Reduced Risk of Type 2 Diabetes in a Danish Cohort of Middle-Aged Adults. / Ibsen, Daniel B; Jakobsen, Marianne U; Halkjær, Jytte; Tjønneland, Anne; Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O; Parner, Erik T; Overvad, Kim.

In: The Journal of Nutrition, Vol. 151, No. 5, 11.05.2021, p. 1241-1248.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Ibsen, DB, Jakobsen, MU, Halkjær, J, Tjønneland, A, Kilpeläinen, TO, Parner, ET & Overvad, K 2021, 'Replacing Red Meat with Other Nonmeat Food Sources of Protein is Associated with a Reduced Risk of Type 2 Diabetes in a Danish Cohort of Middle-Aged Adults', The Journal of Nutrition, vol. 151, no. 5, pp. 1241-1248. https://doi.org/10.1093/jn/nxaa448

APA

Ibsen, D. B., Jakobsen, M. U., Halkjær, J., Tjønneland, A., Kilpeläinen, T. O., Parner, E. T., & Overvad, K. (2021). Replacing Red Meat with Other Nonmeat Food Sources of Protein is Associated with a Reduced Risk of Type 2 Diabetes in a Danish Cohort of Middle-Aged Adults. The Journal of Nutrition, 151(5), 1241-1248. https://doi.org/10.1093/jn/nxaa448

Vancouver

Ibsen DB, Jakobsen MU, Halkjær J, Tjønneland A, Kilpeläinen TO, Parner ET et al. Replacing Red Meat with Other Nonmeat Food Sources of Protein is Associated with a Reduced Risk of Type 2 Diabetes in a Danish Cohort of Middle-Aged Adults. The Journal of Nutrition. 2021 May 11;151(5):1241-1248. https://doi.org/10.1093/jn/nxaa448

Author

Ibsen, Daniel B ; Jakobsen, Marianne U ; Halkjær, Jytte ; Tjønneland, Anne ; Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O ; Parner, Erik T ; Overvad, Kim. / Replacing Red Meat with Other Nonmeat Food Sources of Protein is Associated with a Reduced Risk of Type 2 Diabetes in a Danish Cohort of Middle-Aged Adults. In: The Journal of Nutrition. 2021 ; Vol. 151, No. 5. pp. 1241-1248.

Bibtex

@article{76b7aa521de0447c8bc34d5898fc6627,
title = "Replacing Red Meat with Other Nonmeat Food Sources of Protein is Associated with a Reduced Risk of Type 2 Diabetes in a Danish Cohort of Middle-Aged Adults",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Few cohort studies have modelled replacements of red meat with other sources of protein on subsequent risk of type 2 diabetes using dietary changes.OBJECTIVES: To determine whether replacing red meat with other food sources of protein is associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes.METHODS: We used data from the Danish Diet, Cancer, and Health cohort (n = 39,437) of middle-aged (55-72 years old) men and women who underwent 2 dietary assessments roughly 5 years apart to investigate dietary changes. The pseudo-observation method was used to model the average exposure effect of decreasing the intake of red meat while increasing the intake of either poultry, fish, eggs, milk, yogurt, cheese, whole grains, or refined grains on the subsequent 10-year risk of developing type 2 diabetes, compared with no changes in the intakes of these foods.RESULTS: Replacing 1 serving/day (100 g/day) of red meat with 1 serving/day of eggs [risk difference (RD), -2.7%; 95% CI: -4.0 to -1.1%; serving size: 50 g/day], milk (RD, -1.2%; 95% CI: -2.1 to -0.4%; 200 g/day), yogurt (RD, -1.5%; 95% CI: -2.4 to -0.7%; 70 g/day), whole grains (RD, -1.7%; 95% CI: -2.5 to -0.9%; 30 g/day), or refined grains (RD, -1.2%; 95% CI: -2.0 to -0.3%; 30 g/day) was associated with a reduced risk of type 2 diabetes. Analyses of replacements with poultry or cheese, but not fish, also suggested a lower risk, but with wide CIs. After further adjustment for potential mediators (BMI, waist circumference, and history of hypertension or hypercholesterolemia), only the replacement with eggs was associated with a reduced risk (RD, -1.7%; 95% CI: -3.0 to -0.5%; 50 g/day).CONCLUSIONS: Replacing red meat with eggs in middle-aged adults may reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes. In models not adjusted for potential mediators, replacing red meat with milk, yogurt, whole grains, or refined grains was also associated with a reduced risk of type 2 diabetes.",
author = "Ibsen, {Daniel B} and Jakobsen, {Marianne U} and Jytte Halkj{\ae}r and Anne Tj{\o}nneland and Kilpel{\"a}inen, {Tuomas O} and Parner, {Erik T} and Kim Overvad",
note = "{\textcopyright} The Author(s) 2021. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Society for Nutrition.",
year = "2021",
month = may,
day = "11",
doi = "10.1093/jn/nxaa448",
language = "English",
volume = "151",
pages = "1241--1248",
journal = "Journal of Nutrition",
issn = "0022-3166",
publisher = "American Society for Nutrition",
number = "5",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Replacing Red Meat with Other Nonmeat Food Sources of Protein is Associated with a Reduced Risk of Type 2 Diabetes in a Danish Cohort of Middle-Aged Adults

AU - Ibsen, Daniel B

AU - Jakobsen, Marianne U

AU - Halkjær, Jytte

AU - Tjønneland, Anne

AU - Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O

AU - Parner, Erik T

AU - Overvad, Kim

N1 - © The Author(s) 2021. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Society for Nutrition.

PY - 2021/5/11

Y1 - 2021/5/11

N2 - BACKGROUND: Few cohort studies have modelled replacements of red meat with other sources of protein on subsequent risk of type 2 diabetes using dietary changes.OBJECTIVES: To determine whether replacing red meat with other food sources of protein is associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes.METHODS: We used data from the Danish Diet, Cancer, and Health cohort (n = 39,437) of middle-aged (55-72 years old) men and women who underwent 2 dietary assessments roughly 5 years apart to investigate dietary changes. The pseudo-observation method was used to model the average exposure effect of decreasing the intake of red meat while increasing the intake of either poultry, fish, eggs, milk, yogurt, cheese, whole grains, or refined grains on the subsequent 10-year risk of developing type 2 diabetes, compared with no changes in the intakes of these foods.RESULTS: Replacing 1 serving/day (100 g/day) of red meat with 1 serving/day of eggs [risk difference (RD), -2.7%; 95% CI: -4.0 to -1.1%; serving size: 50 g/day], milk (RD, -1.2%; 95% CI: -2.1 to -0.4%; 200 g/day), yogurt (RD, -1.5%; 95% CI: -2.4 to -0.7%; 70 g/day), whole grains (RD, -1.7%; 95% CI: -2.5 to -0.9%; 30 g/day), or refined grains (RD, -1.2%; 95% CI: -2.0 to -0.3%; 30 g/day) was associated with a reduced risk of type 2 diabetes. Analyses of replacements with poultry or cheese, but not fish, also suggested a lower risk, but with wide CIs. After further adjustment for potential mediators (BMI, waist circumference, and history of hypertension or hypercholesterolemia), only the replacement with eggs was associated with a reduced risk (RD, -1.7%; 95% CI: -3.0 to -0.5%; 50 g/day).CONCLUSIONS: Replacing red meat with eggs in middle-aged adults may reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes. In models not adjusted for potential mediators, replacing red meat with milk, yogurt, whole grains, or refined grains was also associated with a reduced risk of type 2 diabetes.

AB - BACKGROUND: Few cohort studies have modelled replacements of red meat with other sources of protein on subsequent risk of type 2 diabetes using dietary changes.OBJECTIVES: To determine whether replacing red meat with other food sources of protein is associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes.METHODS: We used data from the Danish Diet, Cancer, and Health cohort (n = 39,437) of middle-aged (55-72 years old) men and women who underwent 2 dietary assessments roughly 5 years apart to investigate dietary changes. The pseudo-observation method was used to model the average exposure effect of decreasing the intake of red meat while increasing the intake of either poultry, fish, eggs, milk, yogurt, cheese, whole grains, or refined grains on the subsequent 10-year risk of developing type 2 diabetes, compared with no changes in the intakes of these foods.RESULTS: Replacing 1 serving/day (100 g/day) of red meat with 1 serving/day of eggs [risk difference (RD), -2.7%; 95% CI: -4.0 to -1.1%; serving size: 50 g/day], milk (RD, -1.2%; 95% CI: -2.1 to -0.4%; 200 g/day), yogurt (RD, -1.5%; 95% CI: -2.4 to -0.7%; 70 g/day), whole grains (RD, -1.7%; 95% CI: -2.5 to -0.9%; 30 g/day), or refined grains (RD, -1.2%; 95% CI: -2.0 to -0.3%; 30 g/day) was associated with a reduced risk of type 2 diabetes. Analyses of replacements with poultry or cheese, but not fish, also suggested a lower risk, but with wide CIs. After further adjustment for potential mediators (BMI, waist circumference, and history of hypertension or hypercholesterolemia), only the replacement with eggs was associated with a reduced risk (RD, -1.7%; 95% CI: -3.0 to -0.5%; 50 g/day).CONCLUSIONS: Replacing red meat with eggs in middle-aged adults may reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes. In models not adjusted for potential mediators, replacing red meat with milk, yogurt, whole grains, or refined grains was also associated with a reduced risk of type 2 diabetes.

U2 - 10.1093/jn/nxaa448

DO - 10.1093/jn/nxaa448

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 33693801

VL - 151

SP - 1241

EP - 1248

JO - Journal of Nutrition

JF - Journal of Nutrition

SN - 0022-3166

IS - 5

ER -

ID: 261493653