Challenging leisure activities and mental health: are they more beneficial for some people than for others?

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Standard

Challenging leisure activities and mental health : are they more beneficial for some people than for others? / Santini, Ziggi Ivan; Koushede, Vibeke; Hinrichsen, Carsten; Nelausen, Malene Kubstrup; Madsen, Katrine Rich; Meilstrup, Charlotte; Koyanagi, Ai; Nielsen, Line.

In: Mental Health and Social Inclusion, Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print, 2021.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Santini, ZI, Koushede, V, Hinrichsen, C, Nelausen, MK, Madsen, KR, Meilstrup, C, Koyanagi, A & Nielsen, L 2021, 'Challenging leisure activities and mental health: are they more beneficial for some people than for others?', Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. ahead-of-print, no. ahead-of-print. https://doi.org/10.1108/MHSI-06-2021-0033

APA

Santini, Z. I., Koushede, V., Hinrichsen, C., Nelausen, M. K., Madsen, K. R., Meilstrup, C., Koyanagi, A., & Nielsen, L. (2021). Challenging leisure activities and mental health: are they more beneficial for some people than for others? Mental Health and Social Inclusion, ahead-of-print(ahead-of-print). https://doi.org/10.1108/MHSI-06-2021-0033

Vancouver

Santini ZI, Koushede V, Hinrichsen C, Nelausen MK, Madsen KR, Meilstrup C et al. Challenging leisure activities and mental health: are they more beneficial for some people than for others? Mental Health and Social Inclusion. 2021;ahead-of-print(ahead-of-print). https://doi.org/10.1108/MHSI-06-2021-0033

Author

Santini, Ziggi Ivan ; Koushede, Vibeke ; Hinrichsen, Carsten ; Nelausen, Malene Kubstrup ; Madsen, Katrine Rich ; Meilstrup, Charlotte ; Koyanagi, Ai ; Nielsen, Line. / Challenging leisure activities and mental health : are they more beneficial for some people than for others?. In: Mental Health and Social Inclusion. 2021 ; Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print.

Bibtex

@article{0016ab0bf9fe4cfbb8b6f1e851d1c479,
title = "Challenging leisure activities and mental health: are they more beneficial for some people than for others?",
abstract = "PurposePrevious studies have shown a positive association between being engaged or challenged through a leisure activity and good mental health; however, this relationship may vary by the extent to which individuals feel challenged at work or school. This study aims to examine whether a challenging work/study (or the lack of it) moderates the relationship between engaging in challenging leisure activity and mental health.Design/methodology/approachData from 2,406 adults 16–64 years old from The Danish Mental Health and Well-Being Survey 2016 were linked to Danish national register-based data. Mental well-being (outcome) was assessed using the Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Well-being Scale and depression/anxiety symptoms (outcome) were assessed using the Patient Health Questionnaire-4. Multivariable linear regressions were performed to estimate the association between challenging leisure activity (predictor) and challenging work/study (potential moderator).FindingsOverall, engaging in a challenging leisure activity was positively associated with mental well-being and negatively associated with anxiety symptoms. For these two, a challenging work/study significantly moderated the relationships. The positive association between a challenging activity and mental well-being was strongest among individuals not employed or studying as well as individuals feeling less challenged at work/school. Similarly, the negative association between a challenging activity and anxiety symptoms was strongest among individuals not employed or studying as well as individuals feeling less challenged at work/school. Among individuals with a very challenging work/study, challenging leisure activity was not associated with anxiety symptoms. Finally, engaging in a challenging leisure activity did not significantly predict depression symptoms.Originality/valueMental health promotion strategies may focus on promoting challenging leisure activities especially among groups not employed or enrolled in education or among individuals that do not feel challenged through their work or studies. The results may further have implications for efforts to address and protect employee/student mental health at workplaces or schools.",
keywords = "Faculty of Social Sciences, Well-being, Mental health promotion, Student well-being, Workplace well-being, Leisure activities",
author = "Santini, {Ziggi Ivan} and Vibeke Koushede and Carsten Hinrichsen and Nelausen, {Malene Kubstrup} and Madsen, {Katrine Rich} and Charlotte Meilstrup and Ai Koyanagi and Line Nielsen",
year = "2021",
doi = "10.1108/MHSI-06-2021-0033",
language = "English",
volume = "ahead-of-print",
journal = "Mental Health and Social Inclusion",
issn = "2042-8316",
publisher = "Emerald Group Publishing",
number = "ahead-of-print",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Challenging leisure activities and mental health

T2 - are they more beneficial for some people than for others?

AU - Santini, Ziggi Ivan

AU - Koushede, Vibeke

AU - Hinrichsen, Carsten

AU - Nelausen, Malene Kubstrup

AU - Madsen, Katrine Rich

AU - Meilstrup, Charlotte

AU - Koyanagi, Ai

AU - Nielsen, Line

PY - 2021

Y1 - 2021

N2 - PurposePrevious studies have shown a positive association between being engaged or challenged through a leisure activity and good mental health; however, this relationship may vary by the extent to which individuals feel challenged at work or school. This study aims to examine whether a challenging work/study (or the lack of it) moderates the relationship between engaging in challenging leisure activity and mental health.Design/methodology/approachData from 2,406 adults 16–64 years old from The Danish Mental Health and Well-Being Survey 2016 were linked to Danish national register-based data. Mental well-being (outcome) was assessed using the Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Well-being Scale and depression/anxiety symptoms (outcome) were assessed using the Patient Health Questionnaire-4. Multivariable linear regressions were performed to estimate the association between challenging leisure activity (predictor) and challenging work/study (potential moderator).FindingsOverall, engaging in a challenging leisure activity was positively associated with mental well-being and negatively associated with anxiety symptoms. For these two, a challenging work/study significantly moderated the relationships. The positive association between a challenging activity and mental well-being was strongest among individuals not employed or studying as well as individuals feeling less challenged at work/school. Similarly, the negative association between a challenging activity and anxiety symptoms was strongest among individuals not employed or studying as well as individuals feeling less challenged at work/school. Among individuals with a very challenging work/study, challenging leisure activity was not associated with anxiety symptoms. Finally, engaging in a challenging leisure activity did not significantly predict depression symptoms.Originality/valueMental health promotion strategies may focus on promoting challenging leisure activities especially among groups not employed or enrolled in education or among individuals that do not feel challenged through their work or studies. The results may further have implications for efforts to address and protect employee/student mental health at workplaces or schools.

AB - PurposePrevious studies have shown a positive association between being engaged or challenged through a leisure activity and good mental health; however, this relationship may vary by the extent to which individuals feel challenged at work or school. This study aims to examine whether a challenging work/study (or the lack of it) moderates the relationship between engaging in challenging leisure activity and mental health.Design/methodology/approachData from 2,406 adults 16–64 years old from The Danish Mental Health and Well-Being Survey 2016 were linked to Danish national register-based data. Mental well-being (outcome) was assessed using the Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Well-being Scale and depression/anxiety symptoms (outcome) were assessed using the Patient Health Questionnaire-4. Multivariable linear regressions were performed to estimate the association between challenging leisure activity (predictor) and challenging work/study (potential moderator).FindingsOverall, engaging in a challenging leisure activity was positively associated with mental well-being and negatively associated with anxiety symptoms. For these two, a challenging work/study significantly moderated the relationships. The positive association between a challenging activity and mental well-being was strongest among individuals not employed or studying as well as individuals feeling less challenged at work/school. Similarly, the negative association between a challenging activity and anxiety symptoms was strongest among individuals not employed or studying as well as individuals feeling less challenged at work/school. Among individuals with a very challenging work/study, challenging leisure activity was not associated with anxiety symptoms. Finally, engaging in a challenging leisure activity did not significantly predict depression symptoms.Originality/valueMental health promotion strategies may focus on promoting challenging leisure activities especially among groups not employed or enrolled in education or among individuals that do not feel challenged through their work or studies. The results may further have implications for efforts to address and protect employee/student mental health at workplaces or schools.

KW - Faculty of Social Sciences

KW - Well-being

KW - Mental health promotion

KW - Student well-being

KW - Workplace well-being

KW - Leisure activities

U2 - 10.1108/MHSI-06-2021-0033

DO - 10.1108/MHSI-06-2021-0033

M3 - Journal article

VL - ahead-of-print

JO - Mental Health and Social Inclusion

JF - Mental Health and Social Inclusion

SN - 2042-8316

IS - ahead-of-print

ER -

ID: 278018383