Infertile men's needs and asssessment of fertility care

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Standard

Infertile men's needs and asssessment of fertility care. / Sylvest, Randi; Fürbringer, Jeanette Krogh; Schmidt, Lone; Pinborg, Anja.

In: Upsala Journal of Medical Sciences, Vol. 121, No. 4, 2016, p. 276-282.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Sylvest, R, Fürbringer, JK, Schmidt, L & Pinborg, A 2016, 'Infertile men's needs and asssessment of fertility care', Upsala Journal of Medical Sciences, vol. 121, no. 4, pp. 276-282. https://doi.org/10.1080/03009734.2016.1204393

APA

Sylvest, R., Fürbringer, J. K., Schmidt, L., & Pinborg, A. (2016). Infertile men's needs and asssessment of fertility care. Upsala Journal of Medical Sciences, 121(4), 276-282. https://doi.org/10.1080/03009734.2016.1204393

Vancouver

Sylvest R, Fürbringer JK, Schmidt L, Pinborg A. Infertile men's needs and asssessment of fertility care. Upsala Journal of Medical Sciences. 2016;121(4):276-282. https://doi.org/10.1080/03009734.2016.1204393

Author

Sylvest, Randi ; Fürbringer, Jeanette Krogh ; Schmidt, Lone ; Pinborg, Anja. / Infertile men's needs and asssessment of fertility care. In: Upsala Journal of Medical Sciences. 2016 ; Vol. 121, No. 4. pp. 276-282.

Bibtex

@article{bd8b5f8f9b1e40ea9b1917718d0e1ed3,
title = "Infertile men's needs and asssessment of fertility care",
abstract = "Introduction: Male infertility is potentially a severe, low-control stressor. There is limited knowledge of the expectations, needs, and assessment of fertility care among men with severe infertility. The aim of this study was to explore experience, expectations, needs, and assessment of fertility care among Danish men having severe male-factor infertility.Methods: Semi-structured qualitative interview study with 10 men with very low sperm quality initiating intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) treatment at the Fertility Clinic, Copenhagen University Hospital, Hvidovre, Denmark. Five of the men participated in a follow-up interview after their first ICSI treatment. The data collection took place during November 2014 to May 2015. Data were analysed using qualitative content analysis.Results: Two themes were found: ‘The maze’ and ‘Desire for care’. It felt like an eternity for the men from the referral until treatment started. The men did not understand the process, and it was like being in a maze. The men saw fatherhood as something to strive for. They felt that they could not do what a man is supposed to do, and they felt pushed aside and that treatment focused on the women. The men appreciated the staff’s kindness and professionalism but desired the staff to address emotional subjects too.Conclusion: The process from referral to treatment felt like a maze for these men. They needed the staff to give them the opportunity to speak of the psychosocial consequences of severe male-factor infertility.",
author = "Randi Sylvest and F{\"u}rbringer, {Jeanette Krogh} and Lone Schmidt and Anja Pinborg",
year = "2016",
doi = "10.1080/03009734.2016.1204393",
language = "English",
volume = "121",
pages = "276--282",
journal = "Upsala Journal of Medical Sciences",
issn = "0300-9734",
publisher = "Taylor & Francis",
number = "4",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Infertile men's needs and asssessment of fertility care

AU - Sylvest, Randi

AU - Fürbringer, Jeanette Krogh

AU - Schmidt, Lone

AU - Pinborg, Anja

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - Introduction: Male infertility is potentially a severe, low-control stressor. There is limited knowledge of the expectations, needs, and assessment of fertility care among men with severe infertility. The aim of this study was to explore experience, expectations, needs, and assessment of fertility care among Danish men having severe male-factor infertility.Methods: Semi-structured qualitative interview study with 10 men with very low sperm quality initiating intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) treatment at the Fertility Clinic, Copenhagen University Hospital, Hvidovre, Denmark. Five of the men participated in a follow-up interview after their first ICSI treatment. The data collection took place during November 2014 to May 2015. Data were analysed using qualitative content analysis.Results: Two themes were found: ‘The maze’ and ‘Desire for care’. It felt like an eternity for the men from the referral until treatment started. The men did not understand the process, and it was like being in a maze. The men saw fatherhood as something to strive for. They felt that they could not do what a man is supposed to do, and they felt pushed aside and that treatment focused on the women. The men appreciated the staff’s kindness and professionalism but desired the staff to address emotional subjects too.Conclusion: The process from referral to treatment felt like a maze for these men. They needed the staff to give them the opportunity to speak of the psychosocial consequences of severe male-factor infertility.

AB - Introduction: Male infertility is potentially a severe, low-control stressor. There is limited knowledge of the expectations, needs, and assessment of fertility care among men with severe infertility. The aim of this study was to explore experience, expectations, needs, and assessment of fertility care among Danish men having severe male-factor infertility.Methods: Semi-structured qualitative interview study with 10 men with very low sperm quality initiating intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) treatment at the Fertility Clinic, Copenhagen University Hospital, Hvidovre, Denmark. Five of the men participated in a follow-up interview after their first ICSI treatment. The data collection took place during November 2014 to May 2015. Data were analysed using qualitative content analysis.Results: Two themes were found: ‘The maze’ and ‘Desire for care’. It felt like an eternity for the men from the referral until treatment started. The men did not understand the process, and it was like being in a maze. The men saw fatherhood as something to strive for. They felt that they could not do what a man is supposed to do, and they felt pushed aside and that treatment focused on the women. The men appreciated the staff’s kindness and professionalism but desired the staff to address emotional subjects too.Conclusion: The process from referral to treatment felt like a maze for these men. They needed the staff to give them the opportunity to speak of the psychosocial consequences of severe male-factor infertility.

U2 - 10.1080/03009734.2016.1204393

DO - 10.1080/03009734.2016.1204393

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 27501219

VL - 121

SP - 276

EP - 282

JO - Upsala Journal of Medical Sciences

JF - Upsala Journal of Medical Sciences

SN - 0300-9734

IS - 4

ER -

ID: 169357411