Simvastatin and oxidative stress in humans: A randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled clinical trial

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Standard

Simvastatin and oxidative stress in humans : A randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled clinical trial. / Rasmussen, Sanne Tofte; Andersen, Jon Thor Trærup; Nielsen, Torben Kjær; Cejvanovic, Vanja; Petersen, Kasper Meidahl; Henriksen, Trine; Weimann, Allan; Lykkesfeldt, Jens; Poulsen, Henrik Enghusen.

In: Redox Biology, Vol. 9, 2016, p. 32-38.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Rasmussen, ST, Andersen, JTT, Nielsen, TK, Cejvanovic, V, Petersen, KM, Henriksen, T, Weimann, A, Lykkesfeldt, J & Poulsen, HE 2016, 'Simvastatin and oxidative stress in humans: A randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled clinical trial', Redox Biology, vol. 9, pp. 32-38. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.redox.2016.05.007

APA

Rasmussen, S. T., Andersen, J. T. T., Nielsen, T. K., Cejvanovic, V., Petersen, K. M., Henriksen, T., ... Poulsen, H. E. (2016). Simvastatin and oxidative stress in humans: A randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled clinical trial. Redox Biology, 9, 32-38. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.redox.2016.05.007

Vancouver

Rasmussen ST, Andersen JTT, Nielsen TK, Cejvanovic V, Petersen KM, Henriksen T et al. Simvastatin and oxidative stress in humans: A randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled clinical trial. Redox Biology. 2016;9:32-38. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.redox.2016.05.007

Author

Rasmussen, Sanne Tofte ; Andersen, Jon Thor Trærup ; Nielsen, Torben Kjær ; Cejvanovic, Vanja ; Petersen, Kasper Meidahl ; Henriksen, Trine ; Weimann, Allan ; Lykkesfeldt, Jens ; Poulsen, Henrik Enghusen. / Simvastatin and oxidative stress in humans : A randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled clinical trial. In: Redox Biology. 2016 ; Vol. 9. pp. 32-38.

Bibtex

@article{0087f1c5f1d2423483540d745ac479c3,
title = "Simvastatin and oxidative stress in humans: A randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled clinical trial",
abstract = "Simvastatin reduces the blood concentration of cholesterol by inhibiting hydroxymethylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase, the rate-limiting enzyme in cholesterol synthesis, and thereby reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease. In addition, simvastatin treatment leads to a reduction in fluxes in mitochondrial respiratory complexes I and II and might thereby reduce the formation of reactive oxygen species, which have been implicated in the pathogenesis of arteriosclerosis. Therefore, we hypothesized that simvastatin may reduce oxidative stress in humans in vivo.We conducted a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study in which subjects were treated with either 40 mg of simvastatin or placebo for 14 days. The endpoints were six biomarkers for oxidative stress, which represent intracellular oxidative stress to nucleic acids, lipid peroxidation and plasma antioxidants, that were measured in urine and plasma samples.A total of 40 participants were included, of which 39 completed the trial. The observed differences between simvastatin and placebo groups in the primary outcomes, DNA and RNA oxidation, were small and nonsignificant (p=0.68), specifically, 3{\%} in the simvastatin group compared to 7.1{\%} in the placebo group for DNA oxidation and 7.3{\%} in the simvastatin group compared to 3.4{\%} in the placebo group. The differences in biomarkers related to plasma were not statistically significant between the treatments groups, with the exception of total vitamin E levels, which, as expected, were reduced in parallel with the reduction in plasma cholesterol.In healthy young male volunteers, short-term simvastatin treatment, which considerably reduces cholesterol, does not lead to a clinically relevant reduction in a panel of measures of oxidative stress. Whether simvastatin has effects on oxidative stress in diseased populations, such as diabetes or hemochromatosis, where oxidative stress is prominent, is unknown but seems unlikely.",
author = "Rasmussen, {Sanne Tofte} and Andersen, {Jon Thor Tr{\ae}rup} and Nielsen, {Torben Kj{\ae}r} and Vanja Cejvanovic and Petersen, {Kasper Meidahl} and Trine Henriksen and Allan Weimann and Jens Lykkesfeldt and Poulsen, {Henrik Enghusen}",
year = "2016",
doi = "10.1016/j.redox.2016.05.007",
language = "English",
volume = "9",
pages = "32--38",
journal = "Redox Biology",
issn = "2213-2317",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Simvastatin and oxidative stress in humans

T2 - A randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled clinical trial

AU - Rasmussen, Sanne Tofte

AU - Andersen, Jon Thor Trærup

AU - Nielsen, Torben Kjær

AU - Cejvanovic, Vanja

AU - Petersen, Kasper Meidahl

AU - Henriksen, Trine

AU - Weimann, Allan

AU - Lykkesfeldt, Jens

AU - Poulsen, Henrik Enghusen

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - Simvastatin reduces the blood concentration of cholesterol by inhibiting hydroxymethylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase, the rate-limiting enzyme in cholesterol synthesis, and thereby reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease. In addition, simvastatin treatment leads to a reduction in fluxes in mitochondrial respiratory complexes I and II and might thereby reduce the formation of reactive oxygen species, which have been implicated in the pathogenesis of arteriosclerosis. Therefore, we hypothesized that simvastatin may reduce oxidative stress in humans in vivo.We conducted a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study in which subjects were treated with either 40 mg of simvastatin or placebo for 14 days. The endpoints were six biomarkers for oxidative stress, which represent intracellular oxidative stress to nucleic acids, lipid peroxidation and plasma antioxidants, that were measured in urine and plasma samples.A total of 40 participants were included, of which 39 completed the trial. The observed differences between simvastatin and placebo groups in the primary outcomes, DNA and RNA oxidation, were small and nonsignificant (p=0.68), specifically, 3% in the simvastatin group compared to 7.1% in the placebo group for DNA oxidation and 7.3% in the simvastatin group compared to 3.4% in the placebo group. The differences in biomarkers related to plasma were not statistically significant between the treatments groups, with the exception of total vitamin E levels, which, as expected, were reduced in parallel with the reduction in plasma cholesterol.In healthy young male volunteers, short-term simvastatin treatment, which considerably reduces cholesterol, does not lead to a clinically relevant reduction in a panel of measures of oxidative stress. Whether simvastatin has effects on oxidative stress in diseased populations, such as diabetes or hemochromatosis, where oxidative stress is prominent, is unknown but seems unlikely.

AB - Simvastatin reduces the blood concentration of cholesterol by inhibiting hydroxymethylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase, the rate-limiting enzyme in cholesterol synthesis, and thereby reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease. In addition, simvastatin treatment leads to a reduction in fluxes in mitochondrial respiratory complexes I and II and might thereby reduce the formation of reactive oxygen species, which have been implicated in the pathogenesis of arteriosclerosis. Therefore, we hypothesized that simvastatin may reduce oxidative stress in humans in vivo.We conducted a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study in which subjects were treated with either 40 mg of simvastatin or placebo for 14 days. The endpoints were six biomarkers for oxidative stress, which represent intracellular oxidative stress to nucleic acids, lipid peroxidation and plasma antioxidants, that were measured in urine and plasma samples.A total of 40 participants were included, of which 39 completed the trial. The observed differences between simvastatin and placebo groups in the primary outcomes, DNA and RNA oxidation, were small and nonsignificant (p=0.68), specifically, 3% in the simvastatin group compared to 7.1% in the placebo group for DNA oxidation and 7.3% in the simvastatin group compared to 3.4% in the placebo group. The differences in biomarkers related to plasma were not statistically significant between the treatments groups, with the exception of total vitamin E levels, which, as expected, were reduced in parallel with the reduction in plasma cholesterol.In healthy young male volunteers, short-term simvastatin treatment, which considerably reduces cholesterol, does not lead to a clinically relevant reduction in a panel of measures of oxidative stress. Whether simvastatin has effects on oxidative stress in diseased populations, such as diabetes or hemochromatosis, where oxidative stress is prominent, is unknown but seems unlikely.

U2 - 10.1016/j.redox.2016.05.007

DO - 10.1016/j.redox.2016.05.007

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 27281490

VL - 9

SP - 32

EP - 38

JO - Redox Biology

JF - Redox Biology

SN - 2213-2317

ER -

ID: 167356461