Traffic flow and microbial air contamination in operating rooms at a major teaching hospital in Ghana

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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Traffic flow and microbial air contamination in operating rooms at a major teaching hospital in Ghana. / Stauning, M. T.; Bediako-Bowan, A.; Andersen, L. P.; Opintan, J. A.; Labi, A. K.; Kurtzhals, J. A.L.; Bjerrum, S.

In: Journal of Hospital Infection, Vol. 99, No. 3, 01.07.2018, p. 263-270.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Stauning, MT, Bediako-Bowan, A, Andersen, LP, Opintan, JA, Labi, AK, Kurtzhals, JAL & Bjerrum, S 2018, 'Traffic flow and microbial air contamination in operating rooms at a major teaching hospital in Ghana', Journal of Hospital Infection, vol. 99, no. 3, pp. 263-270. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jhin.2017.12.010

APA

Stauning, M. T., Bediako-Bowan, A., Andersen, L. P., Opintan, J. A., Labi, A. K., Kurtzhals, J. A. L., & Bjerrum, S. (2018). Traffic flow and microbial air contamination in operating rooms at a major teaching hospital in Ghana. Journal of Hospital Infection, 99(3), 263-270. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jhin.2017.12.010

Vancouver

Stauning MT, Bediako-Bowan A, Andersen LP, Opintan JA, Labi AK, Kurtzhals JAL et al. Traffic flow and microbial air contamination in operating rooms at a major teaching hospital in Ghana. Journal of Hospital Infection. 2018 Jul 1;99(3):263-270. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jhin.2017.12.010

Author

Stauning, M. T. ; Bediako-Bowan, A. ; Andersen, L. P. ; Opintan, J. A. ; Labi, A. K. ; Kurtzhals, J. A.L. ; Bjerrum, S. / Traffic flow and microbial air contamination in operating rooms at a major teaching hospital in Ghana. In: Journal of Hospital Infection. 2018 ; Vol. 99, No. 3. pp. 263-270.

Bibtex

@article{9e150b9d82664a4a8f574b08369b2e2c,
title = "Traffic flow and microbial air contamination in operating rooms at a major teaching hospital in Ghana",
abstract = "Background: Current literature examining the relationship between door-opening rate, number of people present, and microbial air contamination in the operating room is limited. Studies are especially needed from low- and middle-income countries, where the risk of surgical site infections is high. Aim: To assess microbial air contamination in operating rooms at a Ghanaian teaching hospital and the association with door-openings and number of people present. Moreover, we aimed to document reasons for door-opening. Methods: We conducted active air-sampling using an MAS 100{\circledR} portable impactor during 124 clean or clean-contaminated elective surgical procedures. The number of people present, door-opening rate and the reasons for each door-opening were recorded by direct observation using pretested structured observation forms. Findings: During surgery, the mean number of colony-forming units (cfu) was 328 cfu/m3 air, and 429 (84{\%}) of 510 samples exceeded a recommended level of 180 cfu/m3. Of 6717 door-openings recorded, 77{\%} were considered unnecessary. Levels of cfu/m3 were strongly correlated with the number of people present (P = 0.001) and with the number of door-openings/h (P = 0.02). In empty operating rooms, the mean cfu count was 39 cfu/m3 after 1 h of uninterrupted ventilation and 52 (51{\%}) of 102 samples exceeded a recommended level of 35 cfu/m3. Conclusion: The study revealed high values of intraoperative airborne cfu exceeding recommended levels. Minimizing the number of door-openings and people present during surgery could be an effective strategy to reduce microbial air contamination in low- and middle-income settings.",
keywords = "Airborne bacteria, Infection control, Low- and middle-income countries, Operating rooms, Staff behaviour, Traffic flow, Air Microbiology, Humans, Male, Ghana, Colony Count, Microbial, Health Personnel, Hospitals, Teaching, Operating Rooms, Female",
author = "Stauning, {M. T.} and A. Bediako-Bowan and Andersen, {L. P.} and Opintan, {J. A.} and Labi, {A. K.} and Kurtzhals, {J. A.L.} and S. Bjerrum",
note = "Copyright {\circledC} 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.",
year = "2018",
month = "7",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.jhin.2017.12.010",
language = "English",
volume = "99",
pages = "263--270",
journal = "Journal of Hospital Infection",
issn = "0195-6701",
publisher = "W.B.Saunders Co. Ltd.",
number = "3",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Traffic flow and microbial air contamination in operating rooms at a major teaching hospital in Ghana

AU - Stauning, M. T.

AU - Bediako-Bowan, A.

AU - Andersen, L. P.

AU - Opintan, J. A.

AU - Labi, A. K.

AU - Kurtzhals, J. A.L.

AU - Bjerrum, S.

N1 - Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

PY - 2018/7/1

Y1 - 2018/7/1

N2 - Background: Current literature examining the relationship between door-opening rate, number of people present, and microbial air contamination in the operating room is limited. Studies are especially needed from low- and middle-income countries, where the risk of surgical site infections is high. Aim: To assess microbial air contamination in operating rooms at a Ghanaian teaching hospital and the association with door-openings and number of people present. Moreover, we aimed to document reasons for door-opening. Methods: We conducted active air-sampling using an MAS 100® portable impactor during 124 clean or clean-contaminated elective surgical procedures. The number of people present, door-opening rate and the reasons for each door-opening were recorded by direct observation using pretested structured observation forms. Findings: During surgery, the mean number of colony-forming units (cfu) was 328 cfu/m3 air, and 429 (84%) of 510 samples exceeded a recommended level of 180 cfu/m3. Of 6717 door-openings recorded, 77% were considered unnecessary. Levels of cfu/m3 were strongly correlated with the number of people present (P = 0.001) and with the number of door-openings/h (P = 0.02). In empty operating rooms, the mean cfu count was 39 cfu/m3 after 1 h of uninterrupted ventilation and 52 (51%) of 102 samples exceeded a recommended level of 35 cfu/m3. Conclusion: The study revealed high values of intraoperative airborne cfu exceeding recommended levels. Minimizing the number of door-openings and people present during surgery could be an effective strategy to reduce microbial air contamination in low- and middle-income settings.

AB - Background: Current literature examining the relationship between door-opening rate, number of people present, and microbial air contamination in the operating room is limited. Studies are especially needed from low- and middle-income countries, where the risk of surgical site infections is high. Aim: To assess microbial air contamination in operating rooms at a Ghanaian teaching hospital and the association with door-openings and number of people present. Moreover, we aimed to document reasons for door-opening. Methods: We conducted active air-sampling using an MAS 100® portable impactor during 124 clean or clean-contaminated elective surgical procedures. The number of people present, door-opening rate and the reasons for each door-opening were recorded by direct observation using pretested structured observation forms. Findings: During surgery, the mean number of colony-forming units (cfu) was 328 cfu/m3 air, and 429 (84%) of 510 samples exceeded a recommended level of 180 cfu/m3. Of 6717 door-openings recorded, 77% were considered unnecessary. Levels of cfu/m3 were strongly correlated with the number of people present (P = 0.001) and with the number of door-openings/h (P = 0.02). In empty operating rooms, the mean cfu count was 39 cfu/m3 after 1 h of uninterrupted ventilation and 52 (51%) of 102 samples exceeded a recommended level of 35 cfu/m3. Conclusion: The study revealed high values of intraoperative airborne cfu exceeding recommended levels. Minimizing the number of door-openings and people present during surgery could be an effective strategy to reduce microbial air contamination in low- and middle-income settings.

KW - Airborne bacteria

KW - Infection control

KW - Low- and middle-income countries

KW - Operating rooms

KW - Staff behaviour

KW - Traffic flow

KW - Air Microbiology

KW - Humans

KW - Male

KW - Ghana

KW - Colony Count, Microbial

KW - Health Personnel

KW - Hospitals, Teaching

KW - Operating Rooms

KW - Female

U2 - 10.1016/j.jhin.2017.12.010

DO - 10.1016/j.jhin.2017.12.010

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 29253624

AN - SCOPUS:85041680684

VL - 99

SP - 263

EP - 270

JO - Journal of Hospital Infection

JF - Journal of Hospital Infection

SN - 0195-6701

IS - 3

ER -

ID: 189862026