Achilles tendinopathy: A prospective study on the effect of active rehabilitation and steroid injections in a clinical setting

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Achilles tendinopathy : A prospective study on the effect of active rehabilitation and steroid injections in a clinical setting. / Wetke, E; Johannsen, F; Langberg, Henning.

In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports, Vol. 25, No. 4, 2015, p. e392–e399.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Wetke, E, Johannsen, F & Langberg, H 2015, 'Achilles tendinopathy: A prospective study on the effect of active rehabilitation and steroid injections in a clinical setting', Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports, vol. 25, no. 4, pp. e392–e399. https://doi.org/10.1111/sms.12326

APA

Wetke, E., Johannsen, F., & Langberg, H. (2015). Achilles tendinopathy: A prospective study on the effect of active rehabilitation and steroid injections in a clinical setting. Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports, 25(4), e392–e399. https://doi.org/10.1111/sms.12326

Vancouver

Wetke E, Johannsen F, Langberg H. Achilles tendinopathy: A prospective study on the effect of active rehabilitation and steroid injections in a clinical setting. Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports. 2015;25(4):e392–e399. https://doi.org/10.1111/sms.12326

Author

Wetke, E ; Johannsen, F ; Langberg, Henning. / Achilles tendinopathy : A prospective study on the effect of active rehabilitation and steroid injections in a clinical setting. In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports. 2015 ; Vol. 25, No. 4. pp. e392–e399.

Bibtex

@article{f95be781e8364b8b84de750753c9bdc0,
title = "Achilles tendinopathy: A prospective study on the effect of active rehabilitation and steroid injections in a clinical setting",
abstract = "In published efficacy studies on Achilles tendinopathy (AT) exercise alone results in improvement in 60-90{\%} of the cases. However, this high success rate cannot be expected in usual clinical practice. We prospectively investigated the effectiveness of a treatment regimen consisting of home-based exercises (concentric, eccentric, and stretching) and optional glucocorticosteroid (GCS) injections in patients with (AT) in a usual clinical setting. Patients unable to commence or progress in exercise were offered GCS, hypothesizing that the GCS would facilitate exercise. Ninety-three consecutive patients with AT referred to two outpatient rheumatology clinics were registered, and seen at five visits over a 6-month period. Exercises seemed to have a slow, but long-lasting effect with GCS having a dramatic short-term effect on symptoms. Twenty-six percent of the patients could proceed with training alone, the remainder received one to three supplementary GCS. There were significant improvements on all outcome variables over time (P ≤ 0.001). At follow-up, 42 had no more symptoms, 29 good result, 16 slightly improved, 4 unchanged, and 2 slightly worse. Overall, 94{\%} of the patients had improved, and we thus recommend the use of GCS injections in AT patients if training alone does not lead to improvement.",
author = "E Wetke and F Johannsen and Henning Langberg",
note = "{\circledC} 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.",
year = "2015",
doi = "10.1111/sms.12326",
language = "English",
volume = "25",
pages = "e392–e399",
journal = "Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports",
issn = "0905-7188",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "4",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Achilles tendinopathy

T2 - A prospective study on the effect of active rehabilitation and steroid injections in a clinical setting

AU - Wetke, E

AU - Johannsen, F

AU - Langberg, Henning

N1 - © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - In published efficacy studies on Achilles tendinopathy (AT) exercise alone results in improvement in 60-90% of the cases. However, this high success rate cannot be expected in usual clinical practice. We prospectively investigated the effectiveness of a treatment regimen consisting of home-based exercises (concentric, eccentric, and stretching) and optional glucocorticosteroid (GCS) injections in patients with (AT) in a usual clinical setting. Patients unable to commence or progress in exercise were offered GCS, hypothesizing that the GCS would facilitate exercise. Ninety-three consecutive patients with AT referred to two outpatient rheumatology clinics were registered, and seen at five visits over a 6-month period. Exercises seemed to have a slow, but long-lasting effect with GCS having a dramatic short-term effect on symptoms. Twenty-six percent of the patients could proceed with training alone, the remainder received one to three supplementary GCS. There were significant improvements on all outcome variables over time (P ≤ 0.001). At follow-up, 42 had no more symptoms, 29 good result, 16 slightly improved, 4 unchanged, and 2 slightly worse. Overall, 94% of the patients had improved, and we thus recommend the use of GCS injections in AT patients if training alone does not lead to improvement.

AB - In published efficacy studies on Achilles tendinopathy (AT) exercise alone results in improvement in 60-90% of the cases. However, this high success rate cannot be expected in usual clinical practice. We prospectively investigated the effectiveness of a treatment regimen consisting of home-based exercises (concentric, eccentric, and stretching) and optional glucocorticosteroid (GCS) injections in patients with (AT) in a usual clinical setting. Patients unable to commence or progress in exercise were offered GCS, hypothesizing that the GCS would facilitate exercise. Ninety-three consecutive patients with AT referred to two outpatient rheumatology clinics were registered, and seen at five visits over a 6-month period. Exercises seemed to have a slow, but long-lasting effect with GCS having a dramatic short-term effect on symptoms. Twenty-six percent of the patients could proceed with training alone, the remainder received one to three supplementary GCS. There were significant improvements on all outcome variables over time (P ≤ 0.001). At follow-up, 42 had no more symptoms, 29 good result, 16 slightly improved, 4 unchanged, and 2 slightly worse. Overall, 94% of the patients had improved, and we thus recommend the use of GCS injections in AT patients if training alone does not lead to improvement.

U2 - 10.1111/sms.12326

DO - 10.1111/sms.12326

M3 - Journal article

VL - 25

SP - e392–e399

JO - Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports

JF - Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports

SN - 0905-7188

IS - 4

ER -

ID: 162899895