Does Perceived Stress Mediate the Association Between Workplace Bullying and Long-Term Sickness Absence?

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Matias Brdsgaard Grynderup, Kirsten Nabe-Nielsen, Theis Lange, Paul Maurice Conway, Jens Peter Bonde, Laura Francioli, Anne Helene Garde, Linda Kaerlev, Reiner Rugulies, Marianne Agergaard Vammen, Annie Høgh (Hogh), Åse Marie Hansen

OBJECTIVE: To examine if perceived stress mediated the association between workplace bullying and subsequent long-term sickness absence.

METHODS: The PRISME cohort was established in 2007 and re-examined in 2009. Questionnaire data about workplace bullying and perceived stress were obtained from 4114 individuals. Participants were followed in registers on long-term sickness absence (≥30 consecutive days of sickness absence).

RESULTS: Workplace bullying was associated with subsequent sickness absence (odds ratio [OR] = 2.05; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.57 to 2.65) and concurrent high perceived stress levels (OR = 2.34; 95% CI: 1.86 to 2.96). A high perceived stress level was also associated with subsequent sickness absence (OR = 1.33; 95% CI: 1.13 to 1.56). Perceived stress explained 13% (95% CI: 6 to 23%) of the total association between bullying and sickness absence.

CONCLUSIONS: The association between workplace bullying and subsequent long-term sickness absence may be partially mediated by perceived stress.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine
Volume58
Issue number6
Pages (from-to)226-230
ISSN1076-2752
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2016

ID: 162316983