Patients' preference for exercise setting and its influence on the health benefits gained from exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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Patients' preference for exercise setting and its influence on the health benefits gained from exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation. / Tang, Lars H.; Berg, Selina Kikkenborg; Christensen, Jan; Lawaetz, Jannik; Doherty, Patrick; Taylor, Rod S.; Langberg, Henning; Zwisler, Ann Dorthe.

In: International Journal of Cardiology, Vol. 232, 01.04.2017, p. 33-39.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Tang, LH, Berg, SK, Christensen, J, Lawaetz, J, Doherty, P, Taylor, RS, Langberg, H & Zwisler, AD 2017, 'Patients' preference for exercise setting and its influence on the health benefits gained from exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation', International Journal of Cardiology, vol. 232, pp. 33-39. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijcard.2017.01.126

APA

Tang, L. H., Berg, S. K., Christensen, J., Lawaetz, J., Doherty, P., Taylor, R. S., ... Zwisler, A. D. (2017). Patients' preference for exercise setting and its influence on the health benefits gained from exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation. International Journal of Cardiology, 232, 33-39. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijcard.2017.01.126

Vancouver

Tang LH, Berg SK, Christensen J, Lawaetz J, Doherty P, Taylor RS et al. Patients' preference for exercise setting and its influence on the health benefits gained from exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation. International Journal of Cardiology. 2017 Apr 1;232:33-39. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijcard.2017.01.126

Author

Tang, Lars H. ; Berg, Selina Kikkenborg ; Christensen, Jan ; Lawaetz, Jannik ; Doherty, Patrick ; Taylor, Rod S. ; Langberg, Henning ; Zwisler, Ann Dorthe. / Patients' preference for exercise setting and its influence on the health benefits gained from exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation. In: International Journal of Cardiology. 2017 ; Vol. 232. pp. 33-39.

Bibtex

@article{bd3115b737fc4b0b90d0a84f84021666,
title = "Patients' preference for exercise setting and its influence on the health benefits gained from exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE: To assess patient preference for exercise setting and examine if choice of setting influences the long-term health benefit of exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation.METHODS: Patients participating in a randomised controlled trial following either heart valve surgery, or radiofrequency ablation for atrial fibrillation were given the choice to perform a 12-week exercise programme in either a supervised centre-based, or a self-management home-based setting. Exercise capacity and physical and mental health outcomes were assessed for up to 24months after hospital discharge. Outcomes between settings were compared using a time×setting interaction using a mixed effects regression model.RESULTS: Across the 158 included patients, an equivalent proportion preferred to undertake exercise rehabilitation in a centre-based setting (55{\%}, 95{\%} CI: 45{\%} to 63{\%}) compared to a home-based setting (45{\%}, 95{\%} CI: 37{\%} to 53{\%}, p=0.233). At baseline, those who preferred a home-based setting reported better physical health (mean difference in physical component score: 5.0, 95{\%} CI 2.3 to 7.4; p=0.001) and higher exercise capacity (mean between group difference 15.9watts, 95{\%} CI 3.7 to 28.1; p=0.011). With the exception of the depression score in the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Score (F(3.65), p=0.004), there was no evidence of a significant difference in outcomes between settings.CONCLUSION: The preference of patients to participate in home-based and centre-based exercise programmes appears to be equivalent and provides similar health benefits. Whilst these findings support that patients should be given the choice between exercise-settings when initiating cardiac rehabilitation, further confirmatory evidence is needed.",
keywords = "Journal Article",
author = "Tang, {Lars H.} and Berg, {Selina Kikkenborg} and Jan Christensen and Jannik Lawaetz and Patrick Doherty and Taylor, {Rod S.} and Henning Langberg and Zwisler, {Ann Dorthe}",
note = "Copyright {\^A}{\circledC} 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.",
year = "2017",
month = "4",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.ijcard.2017.01.126",
language = "English",
volume = "232",
pages = "33--39",
journal = "International Journal of Cardiology",
issn = "0167-5273",
publisher = "Elsevier Ireland Ltd",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Patients' preference for exercise setting and its influence on the health benefits gained from exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation

AU - Tang, Lars H.

AU - Berg, Selina Kikkenborg

AU - Christensen, Jan

AU - Lawaetz, Jannik

AU - Doherty, Patrick

AU - Taylor, Rod S.

AU - Langberg, Henning

AU - Zwisler, Ann Dorthe

N1 - Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

PY - 2017/4/1

Y1 - 2017/4/1

N2 - OBJECTIVE: To assess patient preference for exercise setting and examine if choice of setting influences the long-term health benefit of exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation.METHODS: Patients participating in a randomised controlled trial following either heart valve surgery, or radiofrequency ablation for atrial fibrillation were given the choice to perform a 12-week exercise programme in either a supervised centre-based, or a self-management home-based setting. Exercise capacity and physical and mental health outcomes were assessed for up to 24months after hospital discharge. Outcomes between settings were compared using a time×setting interaction using a mixed effects regression model.RESULTS: Across the 158 included patients, an equivalent proportion preferred to undertake exercise rehabilitation in a centre-based setting (55%, 95% CI: 45% to 63%) compared to a home-based setting (45%, 95% CI: 37% to 53%, p=0.233). At baseline, those who preferred a home-based setting reported better physical health (mean difference in physical component score: 5.0, 95% CI 2.3 to 7.4; p=0.001) and higher exercise capacity (mean between group difference 15.9watts, 95% CI 3.7 to 28.1; p=0.011). With the exception of the depression score in the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Score (F(3.65), p=0.004), there was no evidence of a significant difference in outcomes between settings.CONCLUSION: The preference of patients to participate in home-based and centre-based exercise programmes appears to be equivalent and provides similar health benefits. Whilst these findings support that patients should be given the choice between exercise-settings when initiating cardiac rehabilitation, further confirmatory evidence is needed.

AB - OBJECTIVE: To assess patient preference for exercise setting and examine if choice of setting influences the long-term health benefit of exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation.METHODS: Patients participating in a randomised controlled trial following either heart valve surgery, or radiofrequency ablation for atrial fibrillation were given the choice to perform a 12-week exercise programme in either a supervised centre-based, or a self-management home-based setting. Exercise capacity and physical and mental health outcomes were assessed for up to 24months after hospital discharge. Outcomes between settings were compared using a time×setting interaction using a mixed effects regression model.RESULTS: Across the 158 included patients, an equivalent proportion preferred to undertake exercise rehabilitation in a centre-based setting (55%, 95% CI: 45% to 63%) compared to a home-based setting (45%, 95% CI: 37% to 53%, p=0.233). At baseline, those who preferred a home-based setting reported better physical health (mean difference in physical component score: 5.0, 95% CI 2.3 to 7.4; p=0.001) and higher exercise capacity (mean between group difference 15.9watts, 95% CI 3.7 to 28.1; p=0.011). With the exception of the depression score in the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Score (F(3.65), p=0.004), there was no evidence of a significant difference in outcomes between settings.CONCLUSION: The preference of patients to participate in home-based and centre-based exercise programmes appears to be equivalent and provides similar health benefits. Whilst these findings support that patients should be given the choice between exercise-settings when initiating cardiac rehabilitation, further confirmatory evidence is needed.

KW - Journal Article

U2 - 10.1016/j.ijcard.2017.01.126

DO - 10.1016/j.ijcard.2017.01.126

M3 - Journal article

VL - 232

SP - 33

EP - 39

JO - International Journal of Cardiology

JF - International Journal of Cardiology

SN - 0167-5273

ER -

ID: 173737993