Where backyard poultry raisers seek care for sick poultry: Implications for avian influenza prevention in Bangladesh

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Nadia Ali Rimi, Rebeca Sultana, Kazi Ishtiak-Ahmed, Najmul Haider, Eduardo Azziz-Baumgartner, Nazmun Nahar, Stephen P. Luby

Background: In Bangladesh, backyard poultry raisers lack awareness of avian influenza and infrequently follow government recommendations for its prevention. Identifying where poultry raisers seek care for their ill poultry might help the government better plan how to disseminate avian influenza prevention and control recommendations. Methods: In order to identify where backyard poultry raisers seek care for their ill poultry, we conducted in-depth and informal interviews: 70 with backyard poultry raisers and six with local poultry healthcare providers in two villages, and five with government veterinary professionals at the sub-district and union levels in two districts during June-August 2009. Results: Most (86% [60/70]) raisers sought care for their backyard poultry locally, 14% used home remedies only and none sought care from government veterinary professionals. The local poultry care providers provided advice and medications (n = 6). Four local care providers had shops in the village market where raisers sought healthcare for their poultry and the remaining two visited rural households to provide poultry healthcare services. Five of the six local care providers did not have formal training in veterinary medicine. Local care providers either did not know about avian influenza or considered avian influenza to be a disease common among commercial but not backyard poultry. The government professionals had degrees in veterinary medicine and experience with avian influenza and its prevention. They had their offices at the sub-district or union level and lacked staffing to reach the backyard raisers at the village level. Conclusions: The local poultry care providers provided front line healthcare to backyard poultry in villages and were a potential source of information for the rural raisers. Integration of these local poultry care providers in the government's avian influenza control programs is a potentially useful approach to increase poultry raisers' and local poultry care providers' awareness about avian influenza.

Original languageEnglish
Article number969
JournalBMC Public Health
Volume18
Issue number1
Number of pages9
ISSN1471-2458
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

    Research areas

  • Avian influenza, Backyard poultry raiser, Bangladesh, Informal care provider, poultry care provider, poultry disease, Perception

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