Interstitial and arterial-venous [K+] in human calf muscle during dynamic exercise: effect of ischaemia and relation to muscle pain

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Standard

Interstitial and arterial-venous [K+] in human calf muscle during dynamic exercise : effect of ischaemia and relation to muscle pain. / Green, S; Langberg, Henning; Skovgaard, D; Bulow, J; Kjaer, M.

In: Journal of Physiology, Vol. 529 Pt 3, 2000, p. 849-61.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Green, S, Langberg, H, Skovgaard, D, Bulow, J & Kjaer, M 2000, 'Interstitial and arterial-venous [K+] in human calf muscle during dynamic exercise: effect of ischaemia and relation to muscle pain', Journal of Physiology, vol. 529 Pt 3, pp. 849-61.

APA

Green, S., Langberg, H., Skovgaard, D., Bulow, J., & Kjaer, M. (2000). Interstitial and arterial-venous [K+] in human calf muscle during dynamic exercise: effect of ischaemia and relation to muscle pain. Journal of Physiology, 529 Pt 3, 849-61.

Vancouver

Green S, Langberg H, Skovgaard D, Bulow J, Kjaer M. Interstitial and arterial-venous [K+] in human calf muscle during dynamic exercise: effect of ischaemia and relation to muscle pain. Journal of Physiology. 2000;529 Pt 3:849-61.

Author

Green, S ; Langberg, Henning ; Skovgaard, D ; Bulow, J ; Kjaer, M. / Interstitial and arterial-venous [K+] in human calf muscle during dynamic exercise : effect of ischaemia and relation to muscle pain. In: Journal of Physiology. 2000 ; Vol. 529 Pt 3. pp. 849-61.

Bibtex

@article{68e764160d344bd283218581e85dedf0,
title = "Interstitial and arterial-venous [K+] in human calf muscle during dynamic exercise: effect of ischaemia and relation to muscle pain",
abstract = "Changes in the concentration of interstitial K+ surrounding skeletal muscle fibres ([K+]I) probably play some role in the regulation of cardiovascular adjustments to muscular activity, as well as in the aetiology of muscle pain and fatigue during high-intensity exercise. However, there is very little information on the response of [K+]I to exercise in human skeletal muscle. Five young healthy subjects performed plantar flexion exercise for four 5 min periods at increasing power outputs ( approximately 1-6 W) with 10 min intervening recovery periods, as well as for two 5 min periods with ischaemia at approximately 1 and approximately 3 W. Microdialysis probes were inserted into the gastrocnemius medialis muscle of the right leg to measure [K+]I, and K+ release from the plantar flexors during and after incremental exercise was calculated from plasma flow and arterial-venous differences for K+. Calf muscle pain was assessed using a visual analogue scale. On average, [K+]I was 4.4 mmol l(-1) at rest and increased during minutes 3-5 of incremental exercise by approximately 1-7 mmol l(-1) as a positive function of power output. K+ release also increased as a function of exercise intensity, although there was a progressive increase by approximately 1-6 mmol l-1 in the [K+] gradient between the interstitium and arterial-venous plasma. [K+]I was lower during ischaemic exercise than control exercise. In contrast to this effect of ischaemia on [K+]I, muscle pain was relatively higher during ischaemic exercise, which demonstrates that factors other than changes in [K+]I are responsible for ischaemic muscle pain. In conclusion, this study has demonstrated that during 5 min of dynamic exercise, [K+]I increases during the later period of exercise as a positive function of exercise intensity, ischaemia reduces [K+]I during rest and exercise, and the increase in [K+]I is not responsible for muscle pain during ischaemic exercise.",
keywords = "Adult, Arteries, Exercise, Extracellular Space, Female, Foot, Humans, Ischemia, Leg, Male, Muscle, Skeletal, Muscular Diseases, Pain, Potassium, Reference Values, Veins",
author = "S Green and Henning Langberg and D Skovgaard and J Bulow and M Kjaer",
year = "2000",
language = "English",
volume = "529 Pt 3",
pages = "849--61",
journal = "The Journal of Physiology",
issn = "0022-3751",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Interstitial and arterial-venous [K+] in human calf muscle during dynamic exercise

T2 - effect of ischaemia and relation to muscle pain

AU - Green, S

AU - Langberg, Henning

AU - Skovgaard, D

AU - Bulow, J

AU - Kjaer, M

PY - 2000

Y1 - 2000

N2 - Changes in the concentration of interstitial K+ surrounding skeletal muscle fibres ([K+]I) probably play some role in the regulation of cardiovascular adjustments to muscular activity, as well as in the aetiology of muscle pain and fatigue during high-intensity exercise. However, there is very little information on the response of [K+]I to exercise in human skeletal muscle. Five young healthy subjects performed plantar flexion exercise for four 5 min periods at increasing power outputs ( approximately 1-6 W) with 10 min intervening recovery periods, as well as for two 5 min periods with ischaemia at approximately 1 and approximately 3 W. Microdialysis probes were inserted into the gastrocnemius medialis muscle of the right leg to measure [K+]I, and K+ release from the plantar flexors during and after incremental exercise was calculated from plasma flow and arterial-venous differences for K+. Calf muscle pain was assessed using a visual analogue scale. On average, [K+]I was 4.4 mmol l(-1) at rest and increased during minutes 3-5 of incremental exercise by approximately 1-7 mmol l(-1) as a positive function of power output. K+ release also increased as a function of exercise intensity, although there was a progressive increase by approximately 1-6 mmol l-1 in the [K+] gradient between the interstitium and arterial-venous plasma. [K+]I was lower during ischaemic exercise than control exercise. In contrast to this effect of ischaemia on [K+]I, muscle pain was relatively higher during ischaemic exercise, which demonstrates that factors other than changes in [K+]I are responsible for ischaemic muscle pain. In conclusion, this study has demonstrated that during 5 min of dynamic exercise, [K+]I increases during the later period of exercise as a positive function of exercise intensity, ischaemia reduces [K+]I during rest and exercise, and the increase in [K+]I is not responsible for muscle pain during ischaemic exercise.

AB - Changes in the concentration of interstitial K+ surrounding skeletal muscle fibres ([K+]I) probably play some role in the regulation of cardiovascular adjustments to muscular activity, as well as in the aetiology of muscle pain and fatigue during high-intensity exercise. However, there is very little information on the response of [K+]I to exercise in human skeletal muscle. Five young healthy subjects performed plantar flexion exercise for four 5 min periods at increasing power outputs ( approximately 1-6 W) with 10 min intervening recovery periods, as well as for two 5 min periods with ischaemia at approximately 1 and approximately 3 W. Microdialysis probes were inserted into the gastrocnemius medialis muscle of the right leg to measure [K+]I, and K+ release from the plantar flexors during and after incremental exercise was calculated from plasma flow and arterial-venous differences for K+. Calf muscle pain was assessed using a visual analogue scale. On average, [K+]I was 4.4 mmol l(-1) at rest and increased during minutes 3-5 of incremental exercise by approximately 1-7 mmol l(-1) as a positive function of power output. K+ release also increased as a function of exercise intensity, although there was a progressive increase by approximately 1-6 mmol l-1 in the [K+] gradient between the interstitium and arterial-venous plasma. [K+]I was lower during ischaemic exercise than control exercise. In contrast to this effect of ischaemia on [K+]I, muscle pain was relatively higher during ischaemic exercise, which demonstrates that factors other than changes in [K+]I are responsible for ischaemic muscle pain. In conclusion, this study has demonstrated that during 5 min of dynamic exercise, [K+]I increases during the later period of exercise as a positive function of exercise intensity, ischaemia reduces [K+]I during rest and exercise, and the increase in [K+]I is not responsible for muscle pain during ischaemic exercise.

KW - Adult

KW - Arteries

KW - Exercise

KW - Extracellular Space

KW - Female

KW - Foot

KW - Humans

KW - Ischemia

KW - Leg

KW - Male

KW - Muscle, Skeletal

KW - Muscular Diseases

KW - Pain

KW - Potassium

KW - Reference Values

KW - Veins

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 11118511

VL - 529 Pt 3

SP - 849

EP - 861

JO - The Journal of Physiology

JF - The Journal of Physiology

SN - 0022-3751

ER -

ID: 38368286