Seminar: Packaging, Negotiating, Translating: Transforming Knowledge into Practice

By Corinna Kruse, Jenny Gleisner and Hannah Grankvist, Linköping Universitet

Our fieldwork follows the movement of knowledge from one context or epistemic culture (Knorr Cetina 1999) to another in three different fields – forensics, parental education, and occupational health services. What these three fields have in common is their practitioners’ desire for the knowledge – forensic evidence, medical information, treatments – to remain stable and unchanged in the move.

Such stability across epistemic cultures is difficult to capture with existing STS notions. Thus, we want to propose thinking with infrastructure to capture the work that goes into keeping knowledge stable as it is moved between epistemic cultures. Infrastructures, we propose, provide a set of sensibilities that make it possible to think about the movement of knowledge in a different way, one that draws attention to shared conventions, to work that is not directly related to a particular knowledge object, and to inequalities in access and engagement.

Corinna Kruse is a senior lecturer at the Department of Thematic Studies – Technology and Social Change at Linköping University, Sweden. Her research interests are in knowledge practices – the production as well as the movement of knowledge. This interest has led to an ongoing engagement with forensic evidence in the Swedish criminal justice system, studying both the production and use of forensic evidence from the crime scene to the courtroom and how crime scene technicians are trained to facilitate that production across the criminal justice system. She is the author of The Social Life of Forensic Evidence (2016).

Jenny Gleisner is a research fellow at the Department of Thematic Studies – Technology and Social Change at Linköping University, Sweden. She studies medical practice from an interdisciplinary approach. Through ethnographic research, she studies norms, feelings, and knowledge practices in caring professions and in medical education.

Hannah Grankvist is a research fellow at the Department of Thematic Studies – Technology and Social Change at Linköping University, Sweden. Her research investigates the ethical, social, and policy aspects of translational clinical research of novel medical therapies and technologies, as well as how knowledge produced in one context becomes practice in another. She uses empirical qualitative methods to study how stakeholders such as occupational health practitioners make decisions, negotiate, (re)organize, (re)form, (re)adjust and adapt their work to meet internal and external concerns and demands placed on them.

Everybody is welcome!