Exercise may reduce depression but not anxiety in self-referred cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. Post-hoc analysis of data from the 'Body & Cancer' trial

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Standard

Exercise may reduce depression but not anxiety in self-referred cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. Post-hoc analysis of data from the 'Body & Cancer' trial. / Midtgaard, Julie; Stage, Maria; Møller, Tom; Andersen, Christina; Quist, Morten; Rørth, Mikael; Herrstedt, Jørn; Vistisen, Kirsten; Christiansen, Birgitte; Adamsen, Lis.

In: Acta Oncologica, Vol. 50, No. 5, 2011, p. 660-9.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Midtgaard, J, Stage, M, Møller, T, Andersen, C, Quist, M, Rørth, M, Herrstedt, J, Vistisen, K, Christiansen, B & Adamsen, L 2011, 'Exercise may reduce depression but not anxiety in self-referred cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. Post-hoc analysis of data from the 'Body & Cancer' trial', Acta Oncologica, vol. 50, no. 5, pp. 660-9. https://doi.org/10.3109/0284186X.2010.543145

APA

Midtgaard, J., Stage, M., Møller, T., Andersen, C., Quist, M., Rørth, M., Herrstedt, J., Vistisen, K., Christiansen, B., & Adamsen, L. (2011). Exercise may reduce depression but not anxiety in self-referred cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. Post-hoc analysis of data from the 'Body & Cancer' trial. Acta Oncologica, 50(5), 660-9. https://doi.org/10.3109/0284186X.2010.543145

Vancouver

Midtgaard J, Stage M, Møller T, Andersen C, Quist M, Rørth M et al. Exercise may reduce depression but not anxiety in self-referred cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. Post-hoc analysis of data from the 'Body & Cancer' trial. Acta Oncologica. 2011;50(5):660-9. https://doi.org/10.3109/0284186X.2010.543145

Author

Midtgaard, Julie ; Stage, Maria ; Møller, Tom ; Andersen, Christina ; Quist, Morten ; Rørth, Mikael ; Herrstedt, Jørn ; Vistisen, Kirsten ; Christiansen, Birgitte ; Adamsen, Lis. / Exercise may reduce depression but not anxiety in self-referred cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. Post-hoc analysis of data from the 'Body & Cancer' trial. In: Acta Oncologica. 2011 ; Vol. 50, No. 5. pp. 660-9.

Bibtex

@article{a6a22f923cee4e73ad8e4580a825b3fa,
title = "Exercise may reduce depression but not anxiety in self-referred cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. Post-hoc analysis of data from the 'Body & Cancer' trial",
abstract = "Abstract Background. The diagnosis and treatment of cancer may cause clinically significant and persistent psychological morbidity. The objective of this study was to determine the short-term effect of a six week exercise intervention on anxiety and depression in cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy (The 'Body & Cancer' trial). Methods. Two hundred and nine self-referred patients (52 males, 157 females, mean age 47 years) were randomised into an intervention group and a waiting-list control group. Anxiety and depression was measured by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Results. At baseline, 23.5% and 11.5% of the population scored >8 on the HADS and were classified as suspicious or definite cases of anxiety and depression, respectively. Adjusted for baseline score, disease and demographic covariates the estimated intervention effect showed improvement at six weeks for depression of -0.7 points (95% confidence interval [CI] -1.27 to -0.14, p = 0.0153). No significant effect was seen on anxiety. Further subanalysis, including only suspicious or definite cases of depression, resulted in an estimated intervention effect of -2.53 points (95% CI, -0.64 to -0.42, p = 0.021). Conclusion. Anti-depressant effects could be caused by exercise in self-referred cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. Dedicated trials and follow-up studies are needed to clarify the optimal duration and content of exercise interventions to meet the needs of clinically depressive or anxious patients.",
author = "Julie Midtgaard and Maria Stage and Tom M{\o}ller and Christina Andersen and Morten Quist and Mikael R{\o}rth and J{\o}rn Herrstedt and Kirsten Vistisen and Birgitte Christiansen and Lis Adamsen",
year = "2011",
doi = "10.3109/0284186X.2010.543145",
language = "English",
volume = "50",
pages = "660--9",
journal = "Acta Oncologica",
issn = "0284-186X",
publisher = "Taylor & Francis",
number = "5",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Exercise may reduce depression but not anxiety in self-referred cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. Post-hoc analysis of data from the 'Body & Cancer' trial

AU - Midtgaard, Julie

AU - Stage, Maria

AU - Møller, Tom

AU - Andersen, Christina

AU - Quist, Morten

AU - Rørth, Mikael

AU - Herrstedt, Jørn

AU - Vistisen, Kirsten

AU - Christiansen, Birgitte

AU - Adamsen, Lis

PY - 2011

Y1 - 2011

N2 - Abstract Background. The diagnosis and treatment of cancer may cause clinically significant and persistent psychological morbidity. The objective of this study was to determine the short-term effect of a six week exercise intervention on anxiety and depression in cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy (The 'Body & Cancer' trial). Methods. Two hundred and nine self-referred patients (52 males, 157 females, mean age 47 years) were randomised into an intervention group and a waiting-list control group. Anxiety and depression was measured by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Results. At baseline, 23.5% and 11.5% of the population scored >8 on the HADS and were classified as suspicious or definite cases of anxiety and depression, respectively. Adjusted for baseline score, disease and demographic covariates the estimated intervention effect showed improvement at six weeks for depression of -0.7 points (95% confidence interval [CI] -1.27 to -0.14, p = 0.0153). No significant effect was seen on anxiety. Further subanalysis, including only suspicious or definite cases of depression, resulted in an estimated intervention effect of -2.53 points (95% CI, -0.64 to -0.42, p = 0.021). Conclusion. Anti-depressant effects could be caused by exercise in self-referred cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. Dedicated trials and follow-up studies are needed to clarify the optimal duration and content of exercise interventions to meet the needs of clinically depressive or anxious patients.

AB - Abstract Background. The diagnosis and treatment of cancer may cause clinically significant and persistent psychological morbidity. The objective of this study was to determine the short-term effect of a six week exercise intervention on anxiety and depression in cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy (The 'Body & Cancer' trial). Methods. Two hundred and nine self-referred patients (52 males, 157 females, mean age 47 years) were randomised into an intervention group and a waiting-list control group. Anxiety and depression was measured by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Results. At baseline, 23.5% and 11.5% of the population scored >8 on the HADS and were classified as suspicious or definite cases of anxiety and depression, respectively. Adjusted for baseline score, disease and demographic covariates the estimated intervention effect showed improvement at six weeks for depression of -0.7 points (95% confidence interval [CI] -1.27 to -0.14, p = 0.0153). No significant effect was seen on anxiety. Further subanalysis, including only suspicious or definite cases of depression, resulted in an estimated intervention effect of -2.53 points (95% CI, -0.64 to -0.42, p = 0.021). Conclusion. Anti-depressant effects could be caused by exercise in self-referred cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. Dedicated trials and follow-up studies are needed to clarify the optimal duration and content of exercise interventions to meet the needs of clinically depressive or anxious patients.

U2 - 10.3109/0284186X.2010.543145

DO - 10.3109/0284186X.2010.543145

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 21226544

VL - 50

SP - 660

EP - 669

JO - Acta Oncologica

JF - Acta Oncologica

SN - 0284-186X

IS - 5

ER -

ID: 40179553