How older persons explain why they became victims of abuse

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Standard

How older persons explain why they became victims of abuse. / Mysyuk, Yuliya; Westendorp, Rudi Gerardus Johannes; Lindenberg, Jolanda.

In: Age and Ageing, Vol. 45, No. 5, 05.12.2016, p. 696-702.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Mysyuk, Y, Westendorp, RGJ & Lindenberg, J 2016, 'How older persons explain why they became victims of abuse', Age and Ageing, vol. 45, no. 5, pp. 696-702. https://doi.org/10.1093/ageing/afw100

APA

Mysyuk, Y., Westendorp, R. G. J., & Lindenberg, J. (2016). How older persons explain why they became victims of abuse. Age and Ageing, 45(5), 696-702. https://doi.org/10.1093/ageing/afw100

Vancouver

Mysyuk Y, Westendorp RGJ, Lindenberg J. How older persons explain why they became victims of abuse. Age and Ageing. 2016 Dec 5;45(5):696-702. https://doi.org/10.1093/ageing/afw100

Author

Mysyuk, Yuliya ; Westendorp, Rudi Gerardus Johannes ; Lindenberg, Jolanda. / How older persons explain why they became victims of abuse. In: Age and Ageing. 2016 ; Vol. 45, No. 5. pp. 696-702.

Bibtex

@article{b80f1000184f4c229d44d60044f27d11,
title = "How older persons explain why they became victims of abuse",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: elder abuse greatly impacts the quality of life of older individuals. Prevalence rates range from 3 to 30{\%} depending on the definition used. Only about a dozen studies have explored how older victims themselves experience and explain abuse. It is essential that healthcare professionals understand the perceptions of older victims as they are among the most important groups to handle and report abuse.DESIGN: a qualitative study on the perceptions and experiences of victims of elder abuse was conducted using in-depth semi-structured interviews.SETTING: abused individuals living independently, in residential care facilities and nursing homes.SUBJECTS: six males and 11 females aged 63-90 years.RESULTS: the main causes of abuse identified by older victims themselves were mutual dependency between victim and perpetrator, power and control imbalances, loneliness and a marginalised social position of older persons. Effects of abuse included negative feelings, physical and psychological distress, a change of personal norms and values, changed perspectives on money and low self-efficacy. These differential effects depended upon the types of abuse experienced and the relationship with the perpetrator. Coping strategies mentioned by victims were seeking informal or professional help and using self-help strategies.CONCLUSION: older victims perceive abuse differently depending on the expected acceptability of the type(s) of abuse experienced and the anticipated stigma associated with the perpetrator involved. The effects and chosen coping strategies are influenced by these considerations and therewith also influence their help-seeking behaviour. Healthcare professionals are encouraged to use these findings in practice to prevent, detect and intervene in elder abuse.",
author = "Yuliya Mysyuk and Westendorp, {Rudi Gerardus Johannes} and Jolanda Lindenberg",
note = "{\circledC} The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Geriatrics Society. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.",
year = "2016",
month = "12",
day = "5",
doi = "10.1093/ageing/afw100",
language = "English",
volume = "45",
pages = "696--702",
journal = "Age and Ageing",
issn = "0002-0729",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",
number = "5",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - How older persons explain why they became victims of abuse

AU - Mysyuk, Yuliya

AU - Westendorp, Rudi Gerardus Johannes

AU - Lindenberg, Jolanda

N1 - © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Geriatrics Society. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

PY - 2016/12/5

Y1 - 2016/12/5

N2 - BACKGROUND: elder abuse greatly impacts the quality of life of older individuals. Prevalence rates range from 3 to 30% depending on the definition used. Only about a dozen studies have explored how older victims themselves experience and explain abuse. It is essential that healthcare professionals understand the perceptions of older victims as they are among the most important groups to handle and report abuse.DESIGN: a qualitative study on the perceptions and experiences of victims of elder abuse was conducted using in-depth semi-structured interviews.SETTING: abused individuals living independently, in residential care facilities and nursing homes.SUBJECTS: six males and 11 females aged 63-90 years.RESULTS: the main causes of abuse identified by older victims themselves were mutual dependency between victim and perpetrator, power and control imbalances, loneliness and a marginalised social position of older persons. Effects of abuse included negative feelings, physical and psychological distress, a change of personal norms and values, changed perspectives on money and low self-efficacy. These differential effects depended upon the types of abuse experienced and the relationship with the perpetrator. Coping strategies mentioned by victims were seeking informal or professional help and using self-help strategies.CONCLUSION: older victims perceive abuse differently depending on the expected acceptability of the type(s) of abuse experienced and the anticipated stigma associated with the perpetrator involved. The effects and chosen coping strategies are influenced by these considerations and therewith also influence their help-seeking behaviour. Healthcare professionals are encouraged to use these findings in practice to prevent, detect and intervene in elder abuse.

AB - BACKGROUND: elder abuse greatly impacts the quality of life of older individuals. Prevalence rates range from 3 to 30% depending on the definition used. Only about a dozen studies have explored how older victims themselves experience and explain abuse. It is essential that healthcare professionals understand the perceptions of older victims as they are among the most important groups to handle and report abuse.DESIGN: a qualitative study on the perceptions and experiences of victims of elder abuse was conducted using in-depth semi-structured interviews.SETTING: abused individuals living independently, in residential care facilities and nursing homes.SUBJECTS: six males and 11 females aged 63-90 years.RESULTS: the main causes of abuse identified by older victims themselves were mutual dependency between victim and perpetrator, power and control imbalances, loneliness and a marginalised social position of older persons. Effects of abuse included negative feelings, physical and psychological distress, a change of personal norms and values, changed perspectives on money and low self-efficacy. These differential effects depended upon the types of abuse experienced and the relationship with the perpetrator. Coping strategies mentioned by victims were seeking informal or professional help and using self-help strategies.CONCLUSION: older victims perceive abuse differently depending on the expected acceptability of the type(s) of abuse experienced and the anticipated stigma associated with the perpetrator involved. The effects and chosen coping strategies are influenced by these considerations and therewith also influence their help-seeking behaviour. Healthcare professionals are encouraged to use these findings in practice to prevent, detect and intervene in elder abuse.

U2 - 10.1093/ageing/afw100

DO - 10.1093/ageing/afw100

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 27220701

VL - 45

SP - 696

EP - 702

JO - Age and Ageing

JF - Age and Ageing

SN - 0002-0729

IS - 5

ER -

ID: 162751724