Increasing the general level of academic capacity in general practice: introducing mandatory research training for general practitioner trainees through a participatory research process

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Standard

Increasing the general level of academic capacity in general practice: introducing mandatory research training for general practitioner trainees through a participatory research process. / Tulinius, Anne-Charlotte; Nielsen, Anni Brit Sternhagen; Hansen, Lars Jørgen; Hermann, Christian; Vlasova, Lioudmila; Dalsted, Rikke Juul.

In: Quality in Primary Care (Print), Vol. 20, No. 1, 2012, p. 57.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Harvard

Tulinius, A-C, Nielsen, ABS, Hansen, LJ, Hermann, C, Vlasova, L & Dalsted, RJ 2012, 'Increasing the general level of academic capacity in general practice: introducing mandatory research training for general practitioner trainees through a participatory research process', Quality in Primary Care (Print), vol. 20, no. 1, pp. 57.

APA

Tulinius, A-C., Nielsen, A. B. S., Hansen, L. J., Hermann, C., Vlasova, L., & Dalsted, R. J. (2012). Increasing the general level of academic capacity in general practice: introducing mandatory research training for general practitioner trainees through a participatory research process. Quality in Primary Care (Print), 20(1), 57.

Vancouver

Tulinius A-C, Nielsen ABS, Hansen LJ, Hermann C, Vlasova L, Dalsted RJ. Increasing the general level of academic capacity in general practice: introducing mandatory research training for general practitioner trainees through a participatory research process. Quality in Primary Care (Print). 2012;20(1):57.

Author

Tulinius, Anne-Charlotte ; Nielsen, Anni Brit Sternhagen ; Hansen, Lars Jørgen ; Hermann, Christian ; Vlasova, Lioudmila ; Dalsted, Rikke Juul. / Increasing the general level of academic capacity in general practice: introducing mandatory research training for general practitioner trainees through a participatory research process. In: Quality in Primary Care (Print). 2012 ; Vol. 20, No. 1. pp. 57.

Bibtex

@article{0c67064a7ec9498aabf25a50af587474,
title = "Increasing the general level of academic capacity in general practice: introducing mandatory research training for general practitioner trainees through a participatory research process",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: To obtain good quality evidence-based clinical work there needs to be a culture of critical appraisal, and strong bridges between the clinical and the academic worlds in general practice. AIM: The aim was to educate the general practitioner (GP) trainees to obtain critical appraisal skills, and through the development and implementation of the mandatory programme to gradually empower the GP community to achieve academic capacity by creating a link between the GP researchers and the GP training community. This was done by developing a faculty, giving teaching skills to GP academics, and research skills to GP clinicians; and creating an awareness of the potential benefits of critical appraisal in training GP surgeries. METHODS: Development and implementation of a faculty and a programme through a participatory action research-inspired project, with process evaluation from the beginning of the planning phase. RESULTS: From 2006 to 2009, we built a teaching faculty of 25 teachers among clinical GPs and GP academics; developed the training programme; and delivered the programme to 95 GP trainees. Some of the GP trainees later showed an interest in more substantial research projects, and GP trainers with no previous association with the research environment started to show an interest through their function as GP trainers. The GP academics of the faculty, however, felt that it was difficult to continue the engagement because of the still increasing demand for published knowledge production in academia. CONCLUSION: It is possible to support the development of general academic capacity in general practice using participatory design in collaboration with GP academics and clinicians, building bridges between academia and clinical work, as well as within academia between research publication and teaching. There is, however, a generic barrier in the regulation of academia itself.",
keywords = "Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, Academic training, Education, Evidence-based practice, General Practice, Medical Faculty",
author = "Anne-Charlotte Tulinius and Nielsen, {Anni Brit Sternhagen} and Hansen, {Lars J{\o}rgen} and Christian Hermann and Lioudmila Vlasova and Dalsted, {Rikke Juul}",
year = "2012",
language = "English",
volume = "20",
pages = "57",
journal = "Quality in Primary Care (Print)",
issn = "1479-1072",
publisher = "Radcliffe Publishing",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Increasing the general level of academic capacity in general practice: introducing mandatory research training for general practitioner trainees through a participatory research process

AU - Tulinius, Anne-Charlotte

AU - Nielsen, Anni Brit Sternhagen

AU - Hansen, Lars Jørgen

AU - Hermann, Christian

AU - Vlasova, Lioudmila

AU - Dalsted, Rikke Juul

PY - 2012

Y1 - 2012

N2 - BACKGROUND: To obtain good quality evidence-based clinical work there needs to be a culture of critical appraisal, and strong bridges between the clinical and the academic worlds in general practice. AIM: The aim was to educate the general practitioner (GP) trainees to obtain critical appraisal skills, and through the development and implementation of the mandatory programme to gradually empower the GP community to achieve academic capacity by creating a link between the GP researchers and the GP training community. This was done by developing a faculty, giving teaching skills to GP academics, and research skills to GP clinicians; and creating an awareness of the potential benefits of critical appraisal in training GP surgeries. METHODS: Development and implementation of a faculty and a programme through a participatory action research-inspired project, with process evaluation from the beginning of the planning phase. RESULTS: From 2006 to 2009, we built a teaching faculty of 25 teachers among clinical GPs and GP academics; developed the training programme; and delivered the programme to 95 GP trainees. Some of the GP trainees later showed an interest in more substantial research projects, and GP trainers with no previous association with the research environment started to show an interest through their function as GP trainers. The GP academics of the faculty, however, felt that it was difficult to continue the engagement because of the still increasing demand for published knowledge production in academia. CONCLUSION: It is possible to support the development of general academic capacity in general practice using participatory design in collaboration with GP academics and clinicians, building bridges between academia and clinical work, as well as within academia between research publication and teaching. There is, however, a generic barrier in the regulation of academia itself.

AB - BACKGROUND: To obtain good quality evidence-based clinical work there needs to be a culture of critical appraisal, and strong bridges between the clinical and the academic worlds in general practice. AIM: The aim was to educate the general practitioner (GP) trainees to obtain critical appraisal skills, and through the development and implementation of the mandatory programme to gradually empower the GP community to achieve academic capacity by creating a link between the GP researchers and the GP training community. This was done by developing a faculty, giving teaching skills to GP academics, and research skills to GP clinicians; and creating an awareness of the potential benefits of critical appraisal in training GP surgeries. METHODS: Development and implementation of a faculty and a programme through a participatory action research-inspired project, with process evaluation from the beginning of the planning phase. RESULTS: From 2006 to 2009, we built a teaching faculty of 25 teachers among clinical GPs and GP academics; developed the training programme; and delivered the programme to 95 GP trainees. Some of the GP trainees later showed an interest in more substantial research projects, and GP trainers with no previous association with the research environment started to show an interest through their function as GP trainers. The GP academics of the faculty, however, felt that it was difficult to continue the engagement because of the still increasing demand for published knowledge production in academia. CONCLUSION: It is possible to support the development of general academic capacity in general practice using participatory design in collaboration with GP academics and clinicians, building bridges between academia and clinical work, as well as within academia between research publication and teaching. There is, however, a generic barrier in the regulation of academia itself.

KW - Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences

KW - Academic training

KW - Education

KW - Evidence-based practice

KW - General Practice

KW - Medical Faculty

M3 - Journal article

VL - 20

SP - 57

JO - Quality in Primary Care (Print)

JF - Quality in Primary Care (Print)

SN - 1479-1072

IS - 1

ER -

ID: 38236877