Inflammation, oxidative stress and genotoxicity responses to biodiesel emissions in cultured mammalian cells and animals

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Inflammation, oxidative stress and genotoxicity responses to biodiesel emissions in cultured mammalian cells and animals. / Møller, Peter; Scholten, Rebecca Harnung; Roursgaard, Martin; Krais, Annette M.

In: Critical Reviews in Toxicology, Vol. 50, No. 5, 2020, p. 383-401.

Research output: Contribution to journalReviewResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Møller, P, Scholten, RH, Roursgaard, M & Krais, AM 2020, 'Inflammation, oxidative stress and genotoxicity responses to biodiesel emissions in cultured mammalian cells and animals', Critical Reviews in Toxicology, vol. 50, no. 5, pp. 383-401. https://doi.org/10.1080/10408444.2020.1762541

APA

Møller, P., Scholten, R. H., Roursgaard, M., & Krais, A. M. (2020). Inflammation, oxidative stress and genotoxicity responses to biodiesel emissions in cultured mammalian cells and animals. Critical Reviews in Toxicology, 50(5), 383-401. https://doi.org/10.1080/10408444.2020.1762541

Vancouver

Møller P, Scholten RH, Roursgaard M, Krais AM. Inflammation, oxidative stress and genotoxicity responses to biodiesel emissions in cultured mammalian cells and animals. Critical Reviews in Toxicology. 2020;50(5):383-401. https://doi.org/10.1080/10408444.2020.1762541

Author

Møller, Peter ; Scholten, Rebecca Harnung ; Roursgaard, Martin ; Krais, Annette M. / Inflammation, oxidative stress and genotoxicity responses to biodiesel emissions in cultured mammalian cells and animals. In: Critical Reviews in Toxicology. 2020 ; Vol. 50, No. 5. pp. 383-401.

Bibtex

@article{a1052d4f650e4e68a132dcb1e4454d84,
title = "Inflammation, oxidative stress and genotoxicity responses to biodiesel emissions in cultured mammalian cells and animals",
abstract = "Biodiesel fuels are alternatives to petrodiesel, especially in the transport sector where they have lower carbon footprint. Notwithstanding the environmental benefit, biodiesel fuels may have other toxicological properties than petrodiesel. Particulate matter (PM) from petrodiesel causes cancer in the lung as a consequence of delivery of genotoxic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, oxidative stress and inflammation. We have reviewed articles from 2002 to 2019 (50{\%} of the articles since 2015) that have described toxicological effects in terms of genotoxicity, oxidative stress and inflammation of biodiesel exhaust exposure in humans, animals and cell cultures. The studies have assessed first generation biodiesel from different feedstock (e.g. rapeseed and soy), certain second generation fuels (e.g. waste oil), and hydrogenated vegetable oil. It is not possible to rank the potency of toxicological effects of specific biodiesel fuels. However, exposure to biodiesel exhaust causes oxidative stress, inflammation and genotoxicity in cell cultures. Three studies in animals have not indicated genotoxicity in lung tissue. The database on oxidative stress and inflammation in animal studies is larger (13 studies); ten studies have reported increased levels of oxidative stress biomarkers or inflammation, although the effects have been modest in most studies. The cell culture and animal studies have not consistently shown a different potency in effect between biodiesel and petrodiesel exhausts. Both increased and decreased potency have been reported, which might be due to differences in feedstock or combustion conditions. In conclusion, combustion products from biodiesel and petrodiesel fuel may evoke similar toxicological effects on genotoxicity, oxidative stress and inflammation.",
keywords = "Biodiesel, DNA damage, oxidative stress, inflammation, animal models, in vitro, DIESEL EXHAUST PARTICLES, POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC-HYDROCARBONS, ADHESION MOLECULE EXPRESSION, 28-DAY INHALATION EXPOSURE, HYDROTREATED VEGETABLE-OIL, IN-VITRO CYTOTOXICITY, LUNG EPITHELIAL-CELLS, 2ND-GENERATION BIODIESEL, SOY-BIODIESEL, DNA-DAMAGE",
author = "Peter M{\o}ller and Scholten, {Rebecca Harnung} and Martin Roursgaard and Krais, {Annette M.}",
year = "2020",
doi = "10.1080/10408444.2020.1762541",
language = "English",
volume = "50",
pages = "383--401",
journal = "Critical Reviews in Toxicology",
issn = "1040-8444",
publisher = "Taylor & Francis",
number = "5",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Inflammation, oxidative stress and genotoxicity responses to biodiesel emissions in cultured mammalian cells and animals

AU - Møller, Peter

AU - Scholten, Rebecca Harnung

AU - Roursgaard, Martin

AU - Krais, Annette M.

PY - 2020

Y1 - 2020

N2 - Biodiesel fuels are alternatives to petrodiesel, especially in the transport sector where they have lower carbon footprint. Notwithstanding the environmental benefit, biodiesel fuels may have other toxicological properties than petrodiesel. Particulate matter (PM) from petrodiesel causes cancer in the lung as a consequence of delivery of genotoxic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, oxidative stress and inflammation. We have reviewed articles from 2002 to 2019 (50% of the articles since 2015) that have described toxicological effects in terms of genotoxicity, oxidative stress and inflammation of biodiesel exhaust exposure in humans, animals and cell cultures. The studies have assessed first generation biodiesel from different feedstock (e.g. rapeseed and soy), certain second generation fuels (e.g. waste oil), and hydrogenated vegetable oil. It is not possible to rank the potency of toxicological effects of specific biodiesel fuels. However, exposure to biodiesel exhaust causes oxidative stress, inflammation and genotoxicity in cell cultures. Three studies in animals have not indicated genotoxicity in lung tissue. The database on oxidative stress and inflammation in animal studies is larger (13 studies); ten studies have reported increased levels of oxidative stress biomarkers or inflammation, although the effects have been modest in most studies. The cell culture and animal studies have not consistently shown a different potency in effect between biodiesel and petrodiesel exhausts. Both increased and decreased potency have been reported, which might be due to differences in feedstock or combustion conditions. In conclusion, combustion products from biodiesel and petrodiesel fuel may evoke similar toxicological effects on genotoxicity, oxidative stress and inflammation.

AB - Biodiesel fuels are alternatives to petrodiesel, especially in the transport sector where they have lower carbon footprint. Notwithstanding the environmental benefit, biodiesel fuels may have other toxicological properties than petrodiesel. Particulate matter (PM) from petrodiesel causes cancer in the lung as a consequence of delivery of genotoxic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, oxidative stress and inflammation. We have reviewed articles from 2002 to 2019 (50% of the articles since 2015) that have described toxicological effects in terms of genotoxicity, oxidative stress and inflammation of biodiesel exhaust exposure in humans, animals and cell cultures. The studies have assessed first generation biodiesel from different feedstock (e.g. rapeseed and soy), certain second generation fuels (e.g. waste oil), and hydrogenated vegetable oil. It is not possible to rank the potency of toxicological effects of specific biodiesel fuels. However, exposure to biodiesel exhaust causes oxidative stress, inflammation and genotoxicity in cell cultures. Three studies in animals have not indicated genotoxicity in lung tissue. The database on oxidative stress and inflammation in animal studies is larger (13 studies); ten studies have reported increased levels of oxidative stress biomarkers or inflammation, although the effects have been modest in most studies. The cell culture and animal studies have not consistently shown a different potency in effect between biodiesel and petrodiesel exhausts. Both increased and decreased potency have been reported, which might be due to differences in feedstock or combustion conditions. In conclusion, combustion products from biodiesel and petrodiesel fuel may evoke similar toxicological effects on genotoxicity, oxidative stress and inflammation.

KW - Biodiesel

KW - DNA damage

KW - oxidative stress

KW - inflammation

KW - animal models

KW - in vitro

KW - DIESEL EXHAUST PARTICLES

KW - POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC-HYDROCARBONS

KW - ADHESION MOLECULE EXPRESSION

KW - 28-DAY INHALATION EXPOSURE

KW - HYDROTREATED VEGETABLE-OIL

KW - IN-VITRO CYTOTOXICITY

KW - LUNG EPITHELIAL-CELLS

KW - 2ND-GENERATION BIODIESEL

KW - SOY-BIODIESEL

KW - DNA-DAMAGE

U2 - 10.1080/10408444.2020.1762541

DO - 10.1080/10408444.2020.1762541

M3 - Review

C2 - 32543270

VL - 50

SP - 383

EP - 401

JO - Critical Reviews in Toxicology

JF - Critical Reviews in Toxicology

SN - 1040-8444

IS - 5

ER -

ID: 246673024