Long-term exposure to fine particulate matter and breast cancer incidence in the Danish nurse cohort study

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Long-term exposure to fine particulate matter and breast cancer incidence in the Danish nurse cohort study. / Andersen, Zorana Jovanovic; Ravnskjær, Line; Andersen, Klaus Kaae; Loft, Steffen; Brandt, Jørgen; Becker, Thomas; Ketzel, Matthias; Hertel, Ole; Lynge, Elsebeth; Bräuner, Elvira Vaclavik.

In: Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, Vol. 26, No. 3, 03.2017, p. 428-430.

Research output: Contribution to journalLetterResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Andersen, ZJ, Ravnskjær, L, Andersen, KK, Loft, S, Brandt, J, Becker, T, Ketzel, M, Hertel, O, Lynge, E & Bräuner, EV 2017, 'Long-term exposure to fine particulate matter and breast cancer incidence in the Danish nurse cohort study', Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, vol. 26, no. 3, pp. 428-430. https://doi.org/10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-16-0578

APA

Andersen, Z. J., Ravnskjær, L., Andersen, K. K., Loft, S., Brandt, J., Becker, T., ... Bräuner, E. V. (2017). Long-term exposure to fine particulate matter and breast cancer incidence in the Danish nurse cohort study. Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, 26(3), 428-430. https://doi.org/10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-16-0578

Vancouver

Andersen ZJ, Ravnskjær L, Andersen KK, Loft S, Brandt J, Becker T et al. Long-term exposure to fine particulate matter and breast cancer incidence in the Danish nurse cohort study. Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention. 2017 Mar;26(3):428-430. https://doi.org/10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-16-0578

Author

Andersen, Zorana Jovanovic ; Ravnskjær, Line ; Andersen, Klaus Kaae ; Loft, Steffen ; Brandt, Jørgen ; Becker, Thomas ; Ketzel, Matthias ; Hertel, Ole ; Lynge, Elsebeth ; Bräuner, Elvira Vaclavik. / Long-term exposure to fine particulate matter and breast cancer incidence in the Danish nurse cohort study. In: Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention. 2017 ; Vol. 26, No. 3. pp. 428-430.

Bibtex

@article{660c40d5fef94334b54d4306b99d0e8d,
title = "Long-term exposure to fine particulate matter and breast cancer incidence in the Danish nurse cohort study",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: An association between air pollution and breast cancer risk has been suggested but evidence is sparse and inconclusive.METHODS: We included 22,877 female nurses from the Danish Nurse cohort who were recruited in 1993 or 1999, and followed them for incidence of breast cancer (N=1,145) until 2013 in the Danish Cancer Register. We estimated annual mean concentrations of particulate matter with diameter < 2.5 µg/m3 (PM2.5) and < 10 µg/m3 (PM10), and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) at nurses' residences since 1990 using an atmospheric chemistry transport model. We examined the association between the 3-year running mean of each pollutant and breast cancer incidence using a time-varying Cox regression.RESULTS: We found no association between breast cancer and PM2.5 (hazard ratio; 95{\%} confidence interval: 0.99; 0.94-1.10 per interquartile range of 3.3 µg/m3), PM10 (1.02; 0.94-1.10 per 2.9 µg/m3) or NO2 (0.99; 0.93-1.05 per 7.4 µg/m3).CONCLUSIONS: Air pollution is not associated with breast cancer risk.IMPACT: Exposure to air pollution in adulthood does not increase the risk of breast cancer, but more data on the effects of early exposure, before first birth, are needed.",
author = "Andersen, {Zorana Jovanovic} and Line Ravnskj{\ae}r and Andersen, {Klaus Kaae} and Steffen Loft and J{\o}rgen Brandt and Thomas Becker and Matthias Ketzel and Ole Hertel and Elsebeth Lynge and Br{\"a}uner, {Elvira Vaclavik}",
note = "Copyright {\circledC}2016, American Association for Cancer Research.",
year = "2017",
month = "3",
doi = "10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-16-0578",
language = "English",
volume = "26",
pages = "428--430",
journal = "Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention",
issn = "1055-9965",
publisher = "American Association for Cancer Research (A A C R)",
number = "3",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Long-term exposure to fine particulate matter and breast cancer incidence in the Danish nurse cohort study

AU - Andersen, Zorana Jovanovic

AU - Ravnskjær, Line

AU - Andersen, Klaus Kaae

AU - Loft, Steffen

AU - Brandt, Jørgen

AU - Becker, Thomas

AU - Ketzel, Matthias

AU - Hertel, Ole

AU - Lynge, Elsebeth

AU - Bräuner, Elvira Vaclavik

N1 - Copyright ©2016, American Association for Cancer Research.

PY - 2017/3

Y1 - 2017/3

N2 - BACKGROUND: An association between air pollution and breast cancer risk has been suggested but evidence is sparse and inconclusive.METHODS: We included 22,877 female nurses from the Danish Nurse cohort who were recruited in 1993 or 1999, and followed them for incidence of breast cancer (N=1,145) until 2013 in the Danish Cancer Register. We estimated annual mean concentrations of particulate matter with diameter < 2.5 µg/m3 (PM2.5) and < 10 µg/m3 (PM10), and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) at nurses' residences since 1990 using an atmospheric chemistry transport model. We examined the association between the 3-year running mean of each pollutant and breast cancer incidence using a time-varying Cox regression.RESULTS: We found no association between breast cancer and PM2.5 (hazard ratio; 95% confidence interval: 0.99; 0.94-1.10 per interquartile range of 3.3 µg/m3), PM10 (1.02; 0.94-1.10 per 2.9 µg/m3) or NO2 (0.99; 0.93-1.05 per 7.4 µg/m3).CONCLUSIONS: Air pollution is not associated with breast cancer risk.IMPACT: Exposure to air pollution in adulthood does not increase the risk of breast cancer, but more data on the effects of early exposure, before first birth, are needed.

AB - BACKGROUND: An association between air pollution and breast cancer risk has been suggested but evidence is sparse and inconclusive.METHODS: We included 22,877 female nurses from the Danish Nurse cohort who were recruited in 1993 or 1999, and followed them for incidence of breast cancer (N=1,145) until 2013 in the Danish Cancer Register. We estimated annual mean concentrations of particulate matter with diameter < 2.5 µg/m3 (PM2.5) and < 10 µg/m3 (PM10), and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) at nurses' residences since 1990 using an atmospheric chemistry transport model. We examined the association between the 3-year running mean of each pollutant and breast cancer incidence using a time-varying Cox regression.RESULTS: We found no association between breast cancer and PM2.5 (hazard ratio; 95% confidence interval: 0.99; 0.94-1.10 per interquartile range of 3.3 µg/m3), PM10 (1.02; 0.94-1.10 per 2.9 µg/m3) or NO2 (0.99; 0.93-1.05 per 7.4 µg/m3).CONCLUSIONS: Air pollution is not associated with breast cancer risk.IMPACT: Exposure to air pollution in adulthood does not increase the risk of breast cancer, but more data on the effects of early exposure, before first birth, are needed.

U2 - 10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-16-0578

DO - 10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-16-0578

M3 - Letter

C2 - 27913396

VL - 26

SP - 428

EP - 430

JO - Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention

JF - Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention

SN - 1055-9965

IS - 3

ER -

ID: 169728769