Occupational inequality in health expectancy in Denmark

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Standard

Occupational inequality in health expectancy in Denmark. / Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik; Foverskov, Else; Andersen, Ingelise.

In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, Vol. 48, No. 3, 2020, p. 338-345.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Brønnum-Hansen, H, Foverskov, E & Andersen, I 2020, 'Occupational inequality in health expectancy in Denmark', Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, vol. 48, no. 3, pp. 338-345. https://doi.org/10.1177/1403494819882138

APA

Brønnum-Hansen, H., Foverskov, E., & Andersen, I. (2020). Occupational inequality in health expectancy in Denmark. Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, 48(3), 338-345. https://doi.org/10.1177/1403494819882138

Vancouver

Brønnum-Hansen H, Foverskov E, Andersen I. Occupational inequality in health expectancy in Denmark. Scandinavian Journal of Public Health. 2020;48(3):338-345. https://doi.org/10.1177/1403494819882138

Author

Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik ; Foverskov, Else ; Andersen, Ingelise. / Occupational inequality in health expectancy in Denmark. In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health. 2020 ; Vol. 48, No. 3. pp. 338-345.

Bibtex

@article{31caed5a37674cd6a009c416e63b56a6,
title = "Occupational inequality in health expectancy in Denmark",
abstract = "Background: The pension age in Denmark is adjusted in line with projected increasing life expectancy without taking health differentials between occupational groups into account. The purpose was to study occupational disparities in partial life expectancy and health expectancy between the ages of 50 and 75. Methods: Register data on occupation and mortality were combined with data from the Danish part of Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe in 2010-2014 (N=3179). Expected lifetime without and with activity limitations and without and with long-term illness was estimated by Sullivan's method and comparisons made between four occupational groups. Results: We found clear differences between occupational groups. Expected lifetime without activity limitations between the ages of 50 and 75 was about 4.5 years longer for men and women in high skilled white-collar occupations than for men and women in low skilled blue-collar occupations. Men in high skilled blue-collar and low skilled white-collar occupations could expect 2.3 and 3.8 years shorter lifetimes without activity limitations, respectively, than men in high skilled white-collar occupations. For women in low skilled white-collar occupations, lifetime without activity limitations was 2.6 years shorter than for women in high skilled white-collar occupations. Due to few observations, no results were obtained for women in the high skilled blue-collar group. The social gradient was also significant when health was measured by years without long-term illness. Conclusions: The results support implementation of a flexible pension scheme to take into account the health differentials between occupational groups.",
author = "Henrik Br{\o}nnum-Hansen and Else Foverskov and Ingelise Andersen",
year = "2020",
doi = "10.1177/1403494819882138",
language = "English",
volume = "48",
pages = "338--345",
journal = "Scandinavian Journal of Public Health. Supplement",
issn = "1403-4956",
publisher = "SAGE Publications",
number = "3",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Occupational inequality in health expectancy in Denmark

AU - Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik

AU - Foverskov, Else

AU - Andersen, Ingelise

PY - 2020

Y1 - 2020

N2 - Background: The pension age in Denmark is adjusted in line with projected increasing life expectancy without taking health differentials between occupational groups into account. The purpose was to study occupational disparities in partial life expectancy and health expectancy between the ages of 50 and 75. Methods: Register data on occupation and mortality were combined with data from the Danish part of Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe in 2010-2014 (N=3179). Expected lifetime without and with activity limitations and without and with long-term illness was estimated by Sullivan's method and comparisons made between four occupational groups. Results: We found clear differences between occupational groups. Expected lifetime without activity limitations between the ages of 50 and 75 was about 4.5 years longer for men and women in high skilled white-collar occupations than for men and women in low skilled blue-collar occupations. Men in high skilled blue-collar and low skilled white-collar occupations could expect 2.3 and 3.8 years shorter lifetimes without activity limitations, respectively, than men in high skilled white-collar occupations. For women in low skilled white-collar occupations, lifetime without activity limitations was 2.6 years shorter than for women in high skilled white-collar occupations. Due to few observations, no results were obtained for women in the high skilled blue-collar group. The social gradient was also significant when health was measured by years without long-term illness. Conclusions: The results support implementation of a flexible pension scheme to take into account the health differentials between occupational groups.

AB - Background: The pension age in Denmark is adjusted in line with projected increasing life expectancy without taking health differentials between occupational groups into account. The purpose was to study occupational disparities in partial life expectancy and health expectancy between the ages of 50 and 75. Methods: Register data on occupation and mortality were combined with data from the Danish part of Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe in 2010-2014 (N=3179). Expected lifetime without and with activity limitations and without and with long-term illness was estimated by Sullivan's method and comparisons made between four occupational groups. Results: We found clear differences between occupational groups. Expected lifetime without activity limitations between the ages of 50 and 75 was about 4.5 years longer for men and women in high skilled white-collar occupations than for men and women in low skilled blue-collar occupations. Men in high skilled blue-collar and low skilled white-collar occupations could expect 2.3 and 3.8 years shorter lifetimes without activity limitations, respectively, than men in high skilled white-collar occupations. For women in low skilled white-collar occupations, lifetime without activity limitations was 2.6 years shorter than for women in high skilled white-collar occupations. Due to few observations, no results were obtained for women in the high skilled blue-collar group. The social gradient was also significant when health was measured by years without long-term illness. Conclusions: The results support implementation of a flexible pension scheme to take into account the health differentials between occupational groups.

U2 - 10.1177/1403494819882138

DO - 10.1177/1403494819882138

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 31763956

VL - 48

SP - 338

EP - 345

JO - Scandinavian Journal of Public Health. Supplement

JF - Scandinavian Journal of Public Health. Supplement

SN - 1403-4956

IS - 3

ER -

ID: 231193388