Risk of adverse pregnancy outcome in women exposed to livestock: a study within the Danish National Birth Cohort

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Standard

Risk of adverse pregnancy outcome in women exposed to livestock : a study within the Danish National Birth Cohort. / Nielsen, S Y; Henriksen, T B; Hjøllund, N H; Mølbak, K; Andersen, Anne-Marie Nybo.

In: Epidemiology and Infection, Vol. 142, No. 7, 07.2014, p. 1545-53.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Nielsen, SY, Henriksen, TB, Hjøllund, NH, Mølbak, K & Andersen, A-MN 2014, 'Risk of adverse pregnancy outcome in women exposed to livestock: a study within the Danish National Birth Cohort', Epidemiology and Infection, vol. 142, no. 7, pp. 1545-53. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0950268813002203

APA

Nielsen, S. Y., Henriksen, T. B., Hjøllund, N. H., Mølbak, K., & Andersen, A-M. N. (2014). Risk of adverse pregnancy outcome in women exposed to livestock: a study within the Danish National Birth Cohort. Epidemiology and Infection, 142(7), 1545-53. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0950268813002203

Vancouver

Nielsen SY, Henriksen TB, Hjøllund NH, Mølbak K, Andersen A-MN. Risk of adverse pregnancy outcome in women exposed to livestock: a study within the Danish National Birth Cohort. Epidemiology and Infection. 2014 Jul;142(7):1545-53. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0950268813002203

Author

Nielsen, S Y ; Henriksen, T B ; Hjøllund, N H ; Mølbak, K ; Andersen, Anne-Marie Nybo. / Risk of adverse pregnancy outcome in women exposed to livestock : a study within the Danish National Birth Cohort. In: Epidemiology and Infection. 2014 ; Vol. 142, No. 7. pp. 1545-53.

Bibtex

@article{3afa94377f3f488ebbc38c91d75ccfc2,
title = "Risk of adverse pregnancy outcome in women exposed to livestock: a study within the Danish National Birth Cohort",
abstract = "SUMMARY Maternal infection in pregnancy is a known risk factor for adverse pregnancy outcome, and a number of zoonotic pathogens may constitute a risk to pregnant women and their fetuses. With animal contact as a proxy for the risk of zoonotic infection, this study aimed to evaluate pregnancy outcome in women with self-reported occupational or domestic contact with livestock compared to pregnant women without such contact. The Danish National Birth Cohort collected information on pregnancy outcome from 100 418 pregnant women (1996-2002) from which three study populations with occupational and/or domestic exposure to livestock and a reference group of women with no animal contact was sampled. Outcome measures were miscarriage, very preterm birth (before gestational week 32), preterm birth (before 37 gestational weeks), small for gestational age (SGA), and perinatal death. Adverse reproductive outcomes were assessed in four different exposure groups of women with occupational or domestic exposure to livestock with no association found between exposure to livestock and miscarriage, preterm birth, SGA or perinatal death. These findings should diminish general occupational health concerns for pregnant women with exposures to a range of different farm animals.",
author = "Nielsen, {S Y} and Henriksen, {T B} and Hj{\o}llund, {N H} and K M{\o}lbak and Andersen, {Anne-Marie Nybo}",
year = "2014",
month = "7",
doi = "10.1017/S0950268813002203",
language = "English",
volume = "142",
pages = "1545--53",
journal = "Epidemiology and Infection",
issn = "0950-2688",
publisher = "Cambridge University Press",
number = "7",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Risk of adverse pregnancy outcome in women exposed to livestock

T2 - a study within the Danish National Birth Cohort

AU - Nielsen, S Y

AU - Henriksen, T B

AU - Hjøllund, N H

AU - Mølbak, K

AU - Andersen, Anne-Marie Nybo

PY - 2014/7

Y1 - 2014/7

N2 - SUMMARY Maternal infection in pregnancy is a known risk factor for adverse pregnancy outcome, and a number of zoonotic pathogens may constitute a risk to pregnant women and their fetuses. With animal contact as a proxy for the risk of zoonotic infection, this study aimed to evaluate pregnancy outcome in women with self-reported occupational or domestic contact with livestock compared to pregnant women without such contact. The Danish National Birth Cohort collected information on pregnancy outcome from 100 418 pregnant women (1996-2002) from which three study populations with occupational and/or domestic exposure to livestock and a reference group of women with no animal contact was sampled. Outcome measures were miscarriage, very preterm birth (before gestational week 32), preterm birth (before 37 gestational weeks), small for gestational age (SGA), and perinatal death. Adverse reproductive outcomes were assessed in four different exposure groups of women with occupational or domestic exposure to livestock with no association found between exposure to livestock and miscarriage, preterm birth, SGA or perinatal death. These findings should diminish general occupational health concerns for pregnant women with exposures to a range of different farm animals.

AB - SUMMARY Maternal infection in pregnancy is a known risk factor for adverse pregnancy outcome, and a number of zoonotic pathogens may constitute a risk to pregnant women and their fetuses. With animal contact as a proxy for the risk of zoonotic infection, this study aimed to evaluate pregnancy outcome in women with self-reported occupational or domestic contact with livestock compared to pregnant women without such contact. The Danish National Birth Cohort collected information on pregnancy outcome from 100 418 pregnant women (1996-2002) from which three study populations with occupational and/or domestic exposure to livestock and a reference group of women with no animal contact was sampled. Outcome measures were miscarriage, very preterm birth (before gestational week 32), preterm birth (before 37 gestational weeks), small for gestational age (SGA), and perinatal death. Adverse reproductive outcomes were assessed in four different exposure groups of women with occupational or domestic exposure to livestock with no association found between exposure to livestock and miscarriage, preterm birth, SGA or perinatal death. These findings should diminish general occupational health concerns for pregnant women with exposures to a range of different farm animals.

U2 - 10.1017/S0950268813002203

DO - 10.1017/S0950268813002203

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 24054461

VL - 142

SP - 1545

EP - 1553

JO - Epidemiology and Infection

JF - Epidemiology and Infection

SN - 0950-2688

IS - 7

ER -

ID: 63072014