Smartphone interactions and mental well-being in young adults: A longitudinal study based on objective high-resolution smartphone data

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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Smartphone interactions and mental well-being in young adults : A longitudinal study based on objective high-resolution smartphone data. / Dissing, Agnete Skovlund; Hulvej Rod, Naja; Gerds, Thomas A.; Lund, Rikke.

In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, Vol. 49, No. 3, 2021, p. 325-332.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Dissing, AS, Hulvej Rod, N, Gerds, TA & Lund, R 2021, 'Smartphone interactions and mental well-being in young adults: A longitudinal study based on objective high-resolution smartphone data', Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, vol. 49, no. 3, pp. 325-332. https://doi.org/10.1177/1403494820920418

APA

Dissing, A. S., Hulvej Rod, N., Gerds, T. A., & Lund, R. (2021). Smartphone interactions and mental well-being in young adults: A longitudinal study based on objective high-resolution smartphone data. Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, 49(3), 325-332. https://doi.org/10.1177/1403494820920418

Vancouver

Dissing AS, Hulvej Rod N, Gerds TA, Lund R. Smartphone interactions and mental well-being in young adults: A longitudinal study based on objective high-resolution smartphone data. Scandinavian Journal of Public Health. 2021;49(3):325-332. https://doi.org/10.1177/1403494820920418

Author

Dissing, Agnete Skovlund ; Hulvej Rod, Naja ; Gerds, Thomas A. ; Lund, Rikke. / Smartphone interactions and mental well-being in young adults : A longitudinal study based on objective high-resolution smartphone data. In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health. 2021 ; Vol. 49, No. 3. pp. 325-332.

Bibtex

@article{b38ede9cbdc142a89d9d312b73f50cf6,
title = "Smartphone interactions and mental well-being in young adults: A longitudinal study based on objective high-resolution smartphone data",
abstract = "Aims: To investigate the effects of objectively measured smartphone interactions on indicators of mental well-being among men and women in a population of young adults. Methods: A total of 816 young adults (mean±SD age 21.6±2.6 years; 77% men) from the Copenhagen Network Study were followed with objective recordings of smartphone interactions from calls, texts and social media. Participants self-reported on loneliness, depressive symptoms and disturbed sleep at baseline and in a four-month (interquartile range 75–163 days) follow-up survey. Multiple linear regression was used to analyse the association between smartphone interactions and mental well-being separately for men and women. Results: A higher number of smartphone interactions was associated with lower levels of loneliness at baseline and the same pattern appeared for depressive symptoms, although this was less pronounced. A high level of smartphone interaction was associated with lower levels of disturbed sleep for men, but not for women. In follow-up analyses, a high versus low level of smartphone interaction was associated with an increase in loneliness and depressive symptoms over time for women, but not for men. Conclusions: Smartphone interactions are related to better mental well-being, which may be attributed to the beneficial effects of an underlying social network. Over time, accommodating a large network via smartphone communication might, however, have negative effects on mental well-being for women.",
keywords = "depressive symptoms, loneliness, mental well-being, sleep, Smartphones, social interactions, young adults",
author = "Dissing, {Agnete Skovlund} and {Hulvej Rod}, Naja and Gerds, {Thomas A.} and Rikke Lund",
year = "2021",
doi = "10.1177/1403494820920418",
language = "English",
volume = "49",
pages = "325--332",
journal = "Scandinavian Journal of Public Health. Supplement",
issn = "1403-4956",
publisher = "SAGE Publications",
number = "3",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Smartphone interactions and mental well-being in young adults

T2 - A longitudinal study based on objective high-resolution smartphone data

AU - Dissing, Agnete Skovlund

AU - Hulvej Rod, Naja

AU - Gerds, Thomas A.

AU - Lund, Rikke

PY - 2021

Y1 - 2021

N2 - Aims: To investigate the effects of objectively measured smartphone interactions on indicators of mental well-being among men and women in a population of young adults. Methods: A total of 816 young adults (mean±SD age 21.6±2.6 years; 77% men) from the Copenhagen Network Study were followed with objective recordings of smartphone interactions from calls, texts and social media. Participants self-reported on loneliness, depressive symptoms and disturbed sleep at baseline and in a four-month (interquartile range 75–163 days) follow-up survey. Multiple linear regression was used to analyse the association between smartphone interactions and mental well-being separately for men and women. Results: A higher number of smartphone interactions was associated with lower levels of loneliness at baseline and the same pattern appeared for depressive symptoms, although this was less pronounced. A high level of smartphone interaction was associated with lower levels of disturbed sleep for men, but not for women. In follow-up analyses, a high versus low level of smartphone interaction was associated with an increase in loneliness and depressive symptoms over time for women, but not for men. Conclusions: Smartphone interactions are related to better mental well-being, which may be attributed to the beneficial effects of an underlying social network. Over time, accommodating a large network via smartphone communication might, however, have negative effects on mental well-being for women.

AB - Aims: To investigate the effects of objectively measured smartphone interactions on indicators of mental well-being among men and women in a population of young adults. Methods: A total of 816 young adults (mean±SD age 21.6±2.6 years; 77% men) from the Copenhagen Network Study were followed with objective recordings of smartphone interactions from calls, texts and social media. Participants self-reported on loneliness, depressive symptoms and disturbed sleep at baseline and in a four-month (interquartile range 75–163 days) follow-up survey. Multiple linear regression was used to analyse the association between smartphone interactions and mental well-being separately for men and women. Results: A higher number of smartphone interactions was associated with lower levels of loneliness at baseline and the same pattern appeared for depressive symptoms, although this was less pronounced. A high level of smartphone interaction was associated with lower levels of disturbed sleep for men, but not for women. In follow-up analyses, a high versus low level of smartphone interaction was associated with an increase in loneliness and depressive symptoms over time for women, but not for men. Conclusions: Smartphone interactions are related to better mental well-being, which may be attributed to the beneficial effects of an underlying social network. Over time, accommodating a large network via smartphone communication might, however, have negative effects on mental well-being for women.

KW - depressive symptoms

KW - loneliness

KW - mental well-being

KW - sleep

KW - Smartphones

KW - social interactions

KW - young adults

U2 - 10.1177/1403494820920418

DO - 10.1177/1403494820920418

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 32536319

AN - SCOPUS:85086387842

VL - 49

SP - 325

EP - 332

JO - Scandinavian Journal of Public Health. Supplement

JF - Scandinavian Journal of Public Health. Supplement

SN - 1403-4956

IS - 3

ER -

ID: 243462592