‘The house’ as a framing device for public engagement in STEM museums

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Standard

‘The house’ as a framing device for public engagement in STEM museums. / Whiteley, Louise Emma; Stenslund, Anette; Arnold, Ken; Söderqvist, Thomas.

In: Museum & Society, Vol. 15, No. 2, 07.2017, p. 217-235.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Whiteley, LE, Stenslund, A, Arnold, K & Söderqvist, T 2017, '‘The house’ as a framing device for public engagement in STEM museums', Museum & Society, vol. 15, no. 2, pp. 217-235.

APA

Whiteley, L. E., Stenslund, A., Arnold, K., & Söderqvist, T. (2017). ‘The house’ as a framing device for public engagement in STEM museums. Museum & Society, 15(2), 217-235.

Vancouver

Whiteley LE, Stenslund A, Arnold K, Söderqvist T. ‘The house’ as a framing device for public engagement in STEM museums. Museum & Society. 2017 Jul;15(2):217-235.

Author

Whiteley, Louise Emma ; Stenslund, Anette ; Arnold, Ken ; Söderqvist, Thomas. / ‘The house’ as a framing device for public engagement in STEM museums. In: Museum & Society. 2017 ; Vol. 15, No. 2. pp. 217-235.

Bibtex

@article{9475e69d94774e91b0a8513d45e75446,
title = "‘The house’ as a framing device for public engagement in STEM museums",
abstract = "In the last five to ten years, several science, technology, engineering and medicine (STEM) museums have been experimenting with new forms of public engagement, aiming to be places for curiosity-driven investigation of the cultures of science via multiple perspectives, bringing artists, scientists, researchers, clinicians, members of the public and others together. Yet these diverse and rapidly evolving sites lack a clear definition of their family resemblances – something we argue is crucial for better understanding, advocating, and evaluating what they do. As a starting point for this definitional project we propose ‘the house’ as a metaphor and framing device for public engagement in STEM museums, grounded in experiences at Medical Museion in Denmark and Wellcome Collection in the UK. We further suggest that a Goldilocks principle – the notion of lying between two poles of a continuum in a ‘just right’ position – captures several key features of what it is about the idea of a house that resonates with the approach to public engagement in these museums.",
author = "Whiteley, {Louise Emma} and Anette Stenslund and Ken Arnold and Thomas S{\"o}derqvist",
year = "2017",
month = "7",
language = "English",
volume = "15",
pages = "217--235",
journal = "Museum & Society",
issn = "1479-8360",
publisher = "University of Leicester Department of Museum Studies",
number = "2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - ‘The house’ as a framing device for public engagement in STEM museums

AU - Whiteley, Louise Emma

AU - Stenslund, Anette

AU - Arnold, Ken

AU - Söderqvist, Thomas

PY - 2017/7

Y1 - 2017/7

N2 - In the last five to ten years, several science, technology, engineering and medicine (STEM) museums have been experimenting with new forms of public engagement, aiming to be places for curiosity-driven investigation of the cultures of science via multiple perspectives, bringing artists, scientists, researchers, clinicians, members of the public and others together. Yet these diverse and rapidly evolving sites lack a clear definition of their family resemblances – something we argue is crucial for better understanding, advocating, and evaluating what they do. As a starting point for this definitional project we propose ‘the house’ as a metaphor and framing device for public engagement in STEM museums, grounded in experiences at Medical Museion in Denmark and Wellcome Collection in the UK. We further suggest that a Goldilocks principle – the notion of lying between two poles of a continuum in a ‘just right’ position – captures several key features of what it is about the idea of a house that resonates with the approach to public engagement in these museums.

AB - In the last five to ten years, several science, technology, engineering and medicine (STEM) museums have been experimenting with new forms of public engagement, aiming to be places for curiosity-driven investigation of the cultures of science via multiple perspectives, bringing artists, scientists, researchers, clinicians, members of the public and others together. Yet these diverse and rapidly evolving sites lack a clear definition of their family resemblances – something we argue is crucial for better understanding, advocating, and evaluating what they do. As a starting point for this definitional project we propose ‘the house’ as a metaphor and framing device for public engagement in STEM museums, grounded in experiences at Medical Museion in Denmark and Wellcome Collection in the UK. We further suggest that a Goldilocks principle – the notion of lying between two poles of a continuum in a ‘just right’ position – captures several key features of what it is about the idea of a house that resonates with the approach to public engagement in these museums.

UR - https://www2.le.ac.uk/departments/museumstudies/museumsociety/volumes/volume-15-2017#15-2

M3 - Journal article

VL - 15

SP - 217

EP - 235

JO - Museum & Society

JF - Museum & Society

SN - 1479-8360

IS - 2

ER -

ID: 140434619