Too sick to work, too healthy to qualify: a cross-country analysis of the effect of changes to disability benefits

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Standard

Too sick to work, too healthy to qualify : a cross-country analysis of the effect of changes to disability benefits. / Jensen, Natasja Koitzsch; Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik; Andersen, Ingelise; Thielen, Karsten; McAllister, Ashley; Burström, Bo; Barr, Ben; Whitehead, Margaret; Diderichsen, Finn.

In: Journal of epidemiology and community health, Vol. 73, No. 8, 2019, p. 717-722.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Jensen, NK, Brønnum-Hansen, H, Andersen, I, Thielen, K, McAllister, A, Burström, B, Barr, B, Whitehead, M & Diderichsen, F 2019, 'Too sick to work, too healthy to qualify: a cross-country analysis of the effect of changes to disability benefits', Journal of epidemiology and community health, vol. 73, no. 8, pp. 717-722. https://doi.org/10.1136/jech-2019-212191

APA

Jensen, N. K., Brønnum-Hansen, H., Andersen, I., Thielen, K., McAllister, A., Burström, B., ... Diderichsen, F. (2019). Too sick to work, too healthy to qualify: a cross-country analysis of the effect of changes to disability benefits. Journal of epidemiology and community health, 73(8), 717-722. https://doi.org/10.1136/jech-2019-212191

Vancouver

Jensen NK, Brønnum-Hansen H, Andersen I, Thielen K, McAllister A, Burström B et al. Too sick to work, too healthy to qualify: a cross-country analysis of the effect of changes to disability benefits. Journal of epidemiology and community health. 2019;73(8):717-722. https://doi.org/10.1136/jech-2019-212191

Author

Jensen, Natasja Koitzsch ; Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik ; Andersen, Ingelise ; Thielen, Karsten ; McAllister, Ashley ; Burström, Bo ; Barr, Ben ; Whitehead, Margaret ; Diderichsen, Finn. / Too sick to work, too healthy to qualify : a cross-country analysis of the effect of changes to disability benefits. In: Journal of epidemiology and community health. 2019 ; Vol. 73, No. 8. pp. 717-722.

Bibtex

@article{126056d4f2e94449a3dd871d30f02def,
title = "Too sick to work, too healthy to qualify: a cross-country analysis of the effect of changes to disability benefits",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Denmark and Sweden have implemented reforms that narrowed disability benefit eligibility criteria. Such reforms in combination with increasing work demands create a pincer movement where in particular those with moderate health problems might be unable to comply with work demands, but still not qualify for permanent disability benefits, ending up with temporary means-tested or no benefits. This paper examines whether this actually happened before and after the reforms.METHODS: The Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE) study waves 1-2 and 4-6 in Denmark and Sweden for the age group 50-59 years (N=5384) was used to analyse changes in employment rates and benefits among people with different levels of health before, during and after disability benefit reforms. Interaction between time and health in relation to employment versus permanent or temporary benefits was used as a criterion for whether our hypotheses was confirmed.RESULTS: Overall, employment rates have increased in the age group, but only among the healthy. The OR for receiving temporary or no benefits increased from 1.25 (95{\%} CI: 0.81 to 1.90) before to 1.73 (95{\%} CI: 1.14 to 2.61) after policy reforms for the 29{\%} with moderate health problems and from 2.89 (95{\%} CI: 1.66 to 5.03) to 6.71 (95{\%} CI: 3.94 to 11.42) among the 11{\%} with severe health problems. The interaction between time and health was statistically significant (p<0.001).CONCLUSION: People with impaired health and workability are forced into a life with temporary means-tested or no benefits when pressed by rising work demands and stricter disability benefit eligibility criteria.",
author = "Jensen, {Natasja Koitzsch} and Henrik Br{\o}nnum-Hansen and Ingelise Andersen and Karsten Thielen and Ashley McAllister and Bo Burstr{\"o}m and Ben Barr and Margaret Whitehead and Finn Diderichsen",
note = "{\circledC} Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2019. No commercial re-use. See rights and permissions. Published by BMJ.",
year = "2019",
doi = "10.1136/jech-2019-212191",
language = "English",
volume = "73",
pages = "717--722",
journal = "Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health",
issn = "0143-005X",
publisher = "B M J Group",
number = "8",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Too sick to work, too healthy to qualify

T2 - a cross-country analysis of the effect of changes to disability benefits

AU - Jensen, Natasja Koitzsch

AU - Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik

AU - Andersen, Ingelise

AU - Thielen, Karsten

AU - McAllister, Ashley

AU - Burström, Bo

AU - Barr, Ben

AU - Whitehead, Margaret

AU - Diderichsen, Finn

N1 - © Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2019. No commercial re-use. See rights and permissions. Published by BMJ.

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - BACKGROUND: Denmark and Sweden have implemented reforms that narrowed disability benefit eligibility criteria. Such reforms in combination with increasing work demands create a pincer movement where in particular those with moderate health problems might be unable to comply with work demands, but still not qualify for permanent disability benefits, ending up with temporary means-tested or no benefits. This paper examines whether this actually happened before and after the reforms.METHODS: The Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE) study waves 1-2 and 4-6 in Denmark and Sweden for the age group 50-59 years (N=5384) was used to analyse changes in employment rates and benefits among people with different levels of health before, during and after disability benefit reforms. Interaction between time and health in relation to employment versus permanent or temporary benefits was used as a criterion for whether our hypotheses was confirmed.RESULTS: Overall, employment rates have increased in the age group, but only among the healthy. The OR for receiving temporary or no benefits increased from 1.25 (95% CI: 0.81 to 1.90) before to 1.73 (95% CI: 1.14 to 2.61) after policy reforms for the 29% with moderate health problems and from 2.89 (95% CI: 1.66 to 5.03) to 6.71 (95% CI: 3.94 to 11.42) among the 11% with severe health problems. The interaction between time and health was statistically significant (p<0.001).CONCLUSION: People with impaired health and workability are forced into a life with temporary means-tested or no benefits when pressed by rising work demands and stricter disability benefit eligibility criteria.

AB - BACKGROUND: Denmark and Sweden have implemented reforms that narrowed disability benefit eligibility criteria. Such reforms in combination with increasing work demands create a pincer movement where in particular those with moderate health problems might be unable to comply with work demands, but still not qualify for permanent disability benefits, ending up with temporary means-tested or no benefits. This paper examines whether this actually happened before and after the reforms.METHODS: The Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE) study waves 1-2 and 4-6 in Denmark and Sweden for the age group 50-59 years (N=5384) was used to analyse changes in employment rates and benefits among people with different levels of health before, during and after disability benefit reforms. Interaction between time and health in relation to employment versus permanent or temporary benefits was used as a criterion for whether our hypotheses was confirmed.RESULTS: Overall, employment rates have increased in the age group, but only among the healthy. The OR for receiving temporary or no benefits increased from 1.25 (95% CI: 0.81 to 1.90) before to 1.73 (95% CI: 1.14 to 2.61) after policy reforms for the 29% with moderate health problems and from 2.89 (95% CI: 1.66 to 5.03) to 6.71 (95% CI: 3.94 to 11.42) among the 11% with severe health problems. The interaction between time and health was statistically significant (p<0.001).CONCLUSION: People with impaired health and workability are forced into a life with temporary means-tested or no benefits when pressed by rising work demands and stricter disability benefit eligibility criteria.

U2 - 10.1136/jech-2019-212191

DO - 10.1136/jech-2019-212191

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 31036606

VL - 73

SP - 717

EP - 722

JO - Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health

JF - Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health

SN - 0143-005X

IS - 8

ER -

ID: 217604712