Understanding pathways to inequalities in child mental health: a counterfactual mediation analysis in two national birth cohorts in the UK and Denmark

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Understanding pathways to inequalities in child mental health : a counterfactual mediation analysis in two national birth cohorts in the UK and Denmark. / Lai, Eric T. C.; Schluter, Daniela K.; Lange, Theis; Straatmann, Viviane; Andersen, Anne-Marie Nybo; Strandberg-Larsen, Katrine; Taylor-Robinson, David.

In: BMJ Open, Vol. 10, No. 10, 040056, 2020.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Lai, ETC, Schluter, DK, Lange, T, Straatmann, V, Andersen, A-MN, Strandberg-Larsen, K & Taylor-Robinson, D 2020, 'Understanding pathways to inequalities in child mental health: a counterfactual mediation analysis in two national birth cohorts in the UK and Denmark', BMJ Open, vol. 10, no. 10, 040056. https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2020-040056

APA

Lai, E. T. C., Schluter, D. K., Lange, T., Straatmann, V., Andersen, A-M. N., Strandberg-Larsen, K., & Taylor-Robinson, D. (2020). Understanding pathways to inequalities in child mental health: a counterfactual mediation analysis in two national birth cohorts in the UK and Denmark. BMJ Open, 10(10), [040056]. https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2020-040056

Vancouver

Lai ETC, Schluter DK, Lange T, Straatmann V, Andersen A-MN, Strandberg-Larsen K et al. Understanding pathways to inequalities in child mental health: a counterfactual mediation analysis in two national birth cohorts in the UK and Denmark. BMJ Open. 2020;10(10). 040056. https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2020-040056

Author

Lai, Eric T. C. ; Schluter, Daniela K. ; Lange, Theis ; Straatmann, Viviane ; Andersen, Anne-Marie Nybo ; Strandberg-Larsen, Katrine ; Taylor-Robinson, David. / Understanding pathways to inequalities in child mental health : a counterfactual mediation analysis in two national birth cohorts in the UK and Denmark. In: BMJ Open. 2020 ; Vol. 10, No. 10.

Bibtex

@article{802f7633ce4b43eb8c87ca3cbf0d5f1a,
title = "Understanding pathways to inequalities in child mental health: a counterfactual mediation analysis in two national birth cohorts in the UK and Denmark",
abstract = "Objectives We assessed social inequalities in child mental health problems (MHPs) and how they are mediated by perinatal factors, childhood illness and maternal mental health in two national birth cohorts. Design Longitudinal cohort study Setting We used data from the UK Millennium Cohort Study and the Danish National Birth Cohort. Primary and secondary outcome measures We applied causal mediation analysis to longitudinal cohort data. Socioeconomic conditions (SECs) at birth were measured by maternal education. Our outcome was child MHPs measured by the Strength and Difficulty Questionnaire at age 11. We estimated natural direct, indirect and total effects (TEs) of SECs on MHPs. We calculated the proportion mediated (PM) via three blocks of mediators-perinatal factors (smoking/alcohol use during pregnancy, birth weight and gestational age), childhood illness and maternal mental health. Results At age 11 years, 9{\%} of children in the UK and 3.8{\%} in Denmark had MHPs. Compared with high SECs, children in low SECs had a higher risk of MHPs (relative risk (RR)=4.3, 95{\%} CI 3.3 to 5.5 in the UK, n=13 112; and RR=6.2, 95{\%} CI 4.9 to 7.8 in Denmark, n=35 764). In the UK, perinatal factors mediated 10.2{\%} (95{\%} CI 4.5 to 15.9) of the TE, and adding maternal mental health tripled the PM to 32.2{\%} (95{\%} CI 25.4 to 39.1). In Denmark, perinatal factors mediated 16.5{\%} (95{\%} CI 11.9 to 21.1) of the TE, and including maternal mental health increased the PM to 16.9{\%} (95{\%} CI 11.2 to 22.6). Adding childhood illness made little difference in either country. Conclusion Social inequalities in child mental health are partially explained by perinatal factors in the UK and Denmark. Maternal mental health partially explained inequalities in the UK but not in Denmark.",
keywords = "mental health, social medicine, epidemiology, CHRONIC PHYSICAL ILLNESS, DIFFICULTIES QUESTIONNAIRE, ADOLESCENT HEALTH, PREVALENCE, DISORDERS, STRENGTHS, BEHAVIOR, WEIGHT, RISK",
author = "Lai, {Eric T. C.} and Schluter, {Daniela K.} and Theis Lange and Viviane Straatmann and Andersen, {Anne-Marie Nybo} and Katrine Strandberg-Larsen and David Taylor-Robinson",
year = "2020",
doi = "10.1136/bmjopen-2020-040056",
language = "English",
volume = "10",
journal = "B M J Open",
issn = "2044-6055",
publisher = "BMJ Publishing Group",
number = "10",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Understanding pathways to inequalities in child mental health

T2 - a counterfactual mediation analysis in two national birth cohorts in the UK and Denmark

AU - Lai, Eric T. C.

AU - Schluter, Daniela K.

AU - Lange, Theis

AU - Straatmann, Viviane

AU - Andersen, Anne-Marie Nybo

AU - Strandberg-Larsen, Katrine

AU - Taylor-Robinson, David

PY - 2020

Y1 - 2020

N2 - Objectives We assessed social inequalities in child mental health problems (MHPs) and how they are mediated by perinatal factors, childhood illness and maternal mental health in two national birth cohorts. Design Longitudinal cohort study Setting We used data from the UK Millennium Cohort Study and the Danish National Birth Cohort. Primary and secondary outcome measures We applied causal mediation analysis to longitudinal cohort data. Socioeconomic conditions (SECs) at birth were measured by maternal education. Our outcome was child MHPs measured by the Strength and Difficulty Questionnaire at age 11. We estimated natural direct, indirect and total effects (TEs) of SECs on MHPs. We calculated the proportion mediated (PM) via three blocks of mediators-perinatal factors (smoking/alcohol use during pregnancy, birth weight and gestational age), childhood illness and maternal mental health. Results At age 11 years, 9% of children in the UK and 3.8% in Denmark had MHPs. Compared with high SECs, children in low SECs had a higher risk of MHPs (relative risk (RR)=4.3, 95% CI 3.3 to 5.5 in the UK, n=13 112; and RR=6.2, 95% CI 4.9 to 7.8 in Denmark, n=35 764). In the UK, perinatal factors mediated 10.2% (95% CI 4.5 to 15.9) of the TE, and adding maternal mental health tripled the PM to 32.2% (95% CI 25.4 to 39.1). In Denmark, perinatal factors mediated 16.5% (95% CI 11.9 to 21.1) of the TE, and including maternal mental health increased the PM to 16.9% (95% CI 11.2 to 22.6). Adding childhood illness made little difference in either country. Conclusion Social inequalities in child mental health are partially explained by perinatal factors in the UK and Denmark. Maternal mental health partially explained inequalities in the UK but not in Denmark.

AB - Objectives We assessed social inequalities in child mental health problems (MHPs) and how they are mediated by perinatal factors, childhood illness and maternal mental health in two national birth cohorts. Design Longitudinal cohort study Setting We used data from the UK Millennium Cohort Study and the Danish National Birth Cohort. Primary and secondary outcome measures We applied causal mediation analysis to longitudinal cohort data. Socioeconomic conditions (SECs) at birth were measured by maternal education. Our outcome was child MHPs measured by the Strength and Difficulty Questionnaire at age 11. We estimated natural direct, indirect and total effects (TEs) of SECs on MHPs. We calculated the proportion mediated (PM) via three blocks of mediators-perinatal factors (smoking/alcohol use during pregnancy, birth weight and gestational age), childhood illness and maternal mental health. Results At age 11 years, 9% of children in the UK and 3.8% in Denmark had MHPs. Compared with high SECs, children in low SECs had a higher risk of MHPs (relative risk (RR)=4.3, 95% CI 3.3 to 5.5 in the UK, n=13 112; and RR=6.2, 95% CI 4.9 to 7.8 in Denmark, n=35 764). In the UK, perinatal factors mediated 10.2% (95% CI 4.5 to 15.9) of the TE, and adding maternal mental health tripled the PM to 32.2% (95% CI 25.4 to 39.1). In Denmark, perinatal factors mediated 16.5% (95% CI 11.9 to 21.1) of the TE, and including maternal mental health increased the PM to 16.9% (95% CI 11.2 to 22.6). Adding childhood illness made little difference in either country. Conclusion Social inequalities in child mental health are partially explained by perinatal factors in the UK and Denmark. Maternal mental health partially explained inequalities in the UK but not in Denmark.

KW - mental health

KW - social medicine

KW - epidemiology

KW - CHRONIC PHYSICAL ILLNESS

KW - DIFFICULTIES QUESTIONNAIRE

KW - ADOLESCENT HEALTH

KW - PREVALENCE

KW - DISORDERS

KW - STRENGTHS

KW - BEHAVIOR

KW - WEIGHT

KW - RISK

U2 - 10.1136/bmjopen-2020-040056

DO - 10.1136/bmjopen-2020-040056

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 33046476

VL - 10

JO - B M J Open

JF - B M J Open

SN - 2044-6055

IS - 10

M1 - 040056

ER -

ID: 252036100