Associations between obesity and mental distress in late midlife: results from a large Danish community sample

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Associations between obesity and mental distress in late midlife : results from a large Danish community sample. / Wimmelmann, Cathrine Lawaetz; Lund, Rikke; Christensen, Ulla; Osler, Merete; Mortensen, Erik Lykke.

In: BMC Obesity, Vol. 3, 54, 12.12.2016, p. 1-11.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Wimmelmann, CL, Lund, R, Christensen, U, Osler, M & Mortensen, EL 2016, 'Associations between obesity and mental distress in late midlife: results from a large Danish community sample', BMC Obesity, vol. 3, 54, pp. 1-11. https://doi.org/10.1186/s40608-016-0137-x

APA

Wimmelmann, C. L., Lund, R., Christensen, U., Osler, M., & Mortensen, E. L. (2016). Associations between obesity and mental distress in late midlife: results from a large Danish community sample. BMC Obesity, 3, 1-11. [54]. https://doi.org/10.1186/s40608-016-0137-x

Vancouver

Wimmelmann CL, Lund R, Christensen U, Osler M, Mortensen EL. Associations between obesity and mental distress in late midlife: results from a large Danish community sample. BMC Obesity. 2016 Dec 12;3:1-11. 54. https://doi.org/10.1186/s40608-016-0137-x

Author

Wimmelmann, Cathrine Lawaetz ; Lund, Rikke ; Christensen, Ulla ; Osler, Merete ; Mortensen, Erik Lykke. / Associations between obesity and mental distress in late midlife : results from a large Danish community sample. In: BMC Obesity. 2016 ; Vol. 3. pp. 1-11.

Bibtex

@article{c9435f6f576248b8be6a3123dfcd6c25,
title = "Associations between obesity and mental distress in late midlife: results from a large Danish community sample",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: To examine associations of Body mass Index (BMI) and mental distress in late midlife in a large Danish community sample and to investigate the effect of socio-demographic factors.METHODS: The study sample comprised 3613 Danish men and 1673 women aged 49-63 years from the Copenhagen Ageing and Midlife Biobank (CAMB) with complete information on measured BMI, severity of mental symptoms assessed by the Symptom Check-List' (SCL-90), and socio-demographic factors including sex, age, occupational social class, and educational duration. Linear and logistic regression were used to evaluate associations between BMI category and SCL-90.RESULTS: Unadjusted SCL-90 subscale scores differed significantly across BMI categories (p < 0.001) among both men and women with more mental distress in the underweight, obese and severely obese BMI categories except for the anxiety scale which was not associated with BMI category in women. In the adjusted analyses, all symptom scales remained significantly associated with BMI among men after adjusting for socio-demographic factors while only associations with somatization and depression scales remained significant for women.. When SCL-90 case status was applied as an outcome, significant unadjusted associations with BMI category were observed for somatization (p < 0.001), depression (p = 0.026) and the General Severity Index (p = 0.002) among men and somatization (p = 0.002) among women. Furthermore, somatization case-status was significantly predicted by BMI category (p < 0.001) in men after adjusting for socio-demographic factors.CONCLUSION: Results indicate more mental distress among underweight, obese and severely obese men and women after adjusting for socio-demographic factors. Furthermore, obese men have higher risk of reporting clinically relevant symptoms of somatization independently of socio-demographic factors.",
author = "Wimmelmann, {Cathrine Lawaetz} and Rikke Lund and Ulla Christensen and Merete Osler and Mortensen, {Erik Lykke}",
year = "2016",
month = "12",
day = "12",
doi = "10.1186/s40608-016-0137-x",
language = "English",
volume = "3",
pages = "1--11",
journal = "BMC Obesity",
issn = "2052-9538",
publisher = "BioMed Central",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Associations between obesity and mental distress in late midlife

T2 - results from a large Danish community sample

AU - Wimmelmann, Cathrine Lawaetz

AU - Lund, Rikke

AU - Christensen, Ulla

AU - Osler, Merete

AU - Mortensen, Erik Lykke

PY - 2016/12/12

Y1 - 2016/12/12

N2 - BACKGROUND: To examine associations of Body mass Index (BMI) and mental distress in late midlife in a large Danish community sample and to investigate the effect of socio-demographic factors.METHODS: The study sample comprised 3613 Danish men and 1673 women aged 49-63 years from the Copenhagen Ageing and Midlife Biobank (CAMB) with complete information on measured BMI, severity of mental symptoms assessed by the Symptom Check-List' (SCL-90), and socio-demographic factors including sex, age, occupational social class, and educational duration. Linear and logistic regression were used to evaluate associations between BMI category and SCL-90.RESULTS: Unadjusted SCL-90 subscale scores differed significantly across BMI categories (p < 0.001) among both men and women with more mental distress in the underweight, obese and severely obese BMI categories except for the anxiety scale which was not associated with BMI category in women. In the adjusted analyses, all symptom scales remained significantly associated with BMI among men after adjusting for socio-demographic factors while only associations with somatization and depression scales remained significant for women.. When SCL-90 case status was applied as an outcome, significant unadjusted associations with BMI category were observed for somatization (p < 0.001), depression (p = 0.026) and the General Severity Index (p = 0.002) among men and somatization (p = 0.002) among women. Furthermore, somatization case-status was significantly predicted by BMI category (p < 0.001) in men after adjusting for socio-demographic factors.CONCLUSION: Results indicate more mental distress among underweight, obese and severely obese men and women after adjusting for socio-demographic factors. Furthermore, obese men have higher risk of reporting clinically relevant symptoms of somatization independently of socio-demographic factors.

AB - BACKGROUND: To examine associations of Body mass Index (BMI) and mental distress in late midlife in a large Danish community sample and to investigate the effect of socio-demographic factors.METHODS: The study sample comprised 3613 Danish men and 1673 women aged 49-63 years from the Copenhagen Ageing and Midlife Biobank (CAMB) with complete information on measured BMI, severity of mental symptoms assessed by the Symptom Check-List' (SCL-90), and socio-demographic factors including sex, age, occupational social class, and educational duration. Linear and logistic regression were used to evaluate associations between BMI category and SCL-90.RESULTS: Unadjusted SCL-90 subscale scores differed significantly across BMI categories (p < 0.001) among both men and women with more mental distress in the underweight, obese and severely obese BMI categories except for the anxiety scale which was not associated with BMI category in women. In the adjusted analyses, all symptom scales remained significantly associated with BMI among men after adjusting for socio-demographic factors while only associations with somatization and depression scales remained significant for women.. When SCL-90 case status was applied as an outcome, significant unadjusted associations with BMI category were observed for somatization (p < 0.001), depression (p = 0.026) and the General Severity Index (p = 0.002) among men and somatization (p = 0.002) among women. Furthermore, somatization case-status was significantly predicted by BMI category (p < 0.001) in men after adjusting for socio-demographic factors.CONCLUSION: Results indicate more mental distress among underweight, obese and severely obese men and women after adjusting for socio-demographic factors. Furthermore, obese men have higher risk of reporting clinically relevant symptoms of somatization independently of socio-demographic factors.

U2 - 10.1186/s40608-016-0137-x

DO - 10.1186/s40608-016-0137-x

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 27999678

VL - 3

SP - 1

EP - 11

JO - BMC Obesity

JF - BMC Obesity

SN - 2052-9538

M1 - 54

ER -

ID: 171586931