Occupational position and its relation to mental distress in a random sample of Danish residents

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Standard

Occupational position and its relation to mental distress in a random sample of Danish residents. / Rugulies, Reiner Ernst; Madsen, Ida E H; Nielsen, Maj Britt D; Olsen, Lis R; Mortensen, Erik L; Bech, Per.

In: International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, Vol. 83, No. 6, 2010, p. 625-9.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Rugulies, RE, Madsen, IEH, Nielsen, MBD, Olsen, LR, Mortensen, EL & Bech, P 2010, 'Occupational position and its relation to mental distress in a random sample of Danish residents', International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, vol. 83, no. 6, pp. 625-9. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00420-009-0492-8

APA

Rugulies, R. E., Madsen, I. E. H., Nielsen, M. B. D., Olsen, L. R., Mortensen, E. L., & Bech, P. (2010). Occupational position and its relation to mental distress in a random sample of Danish residents. International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, 83(6), 625-9. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00420-009-0492-8

Vancouver

Rugulies RE, Madsen IEH, Nielsen MBD, Olsen LR, Mortensen EL, Bech P. Occupational position and its relation to mental distress in a random sample of Danish residents. International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health. 2010;83(6):625-9. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00420-009-0492-8

Author

Rugulies, Reiner Ernst ; Madsen, Ida E H ; Nielsen, Maj Britt D ; Olsen, Lis R ; Mortensen, Erik L ; Bech, Per. / Occupational position and its relation to mental distress in a random sample of Danish residents. In: International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health. 2010 ; Vol. 83, No. 6. pp. 625-9.

Bibtex

@article{06564900f8a311dfb6d2000ea68e967b,
title = "Occupational position and its relation to mental distress in a random sample of Danish residents",
abstract = "PURPOSE: To analyze the distribution of depressive, anxiety, and somatization symptoms across different occupational positions in a random sample of Danish residents. METHODS: The study sample consisted of 591 Danish residents (50{\%} women), aged 20-65, drawn from an age- and gender-stratified random sample of the Danish population. Participants filled out a survey that included the 92 item version of the Hopkins Symptom Checklist (SCL-92). We categorized occupational position into seven groups: high- and low-grade non-manual workers, skilled and unskilled manual workers, high- and low-grade self-employed, and unemployed. RESULTS: Compared to the reference group of high-grade non-manual workers, the depressive symptom score was statistically significantly elevated among unskilled manual workers (P = 0.043) and the unemployed (P < 0.001), after adjustment for age, gender, cohabitation, life events, and low household income. The anxiety symptom score was elevated only among the unemployed (P = 0.004). The somatization symptom score was elevated among unskilled manual workers (P = 0.002), the low-grade self-employed (P = 0.023), and the unemployed (P = 0.001). When we analyzed caseness of severe symptoms, we found that unskilled manual workers (OR = 3.27, 95{\%} CI = 1.06-10.04) and the unemployed (OR = 6.20, 95{\%} CI = 1.98-19.42) had a higher prevalence of severe depressive symptoms, compared to the reference group of high-grade non-manual workers. The unemployed also had a higher prevalence of severe somatization symptoms (OR = 6.28, 95{\%} CI = 1.39-28.46). CONCLUSIONS: Unskilled manual workers, the unemployed, and, to a lesser extent, the low-grade self-employed showed an increased level of mental distress. Activities to promote mental health in the Danish population should be directed toward these groups.",
author = "Rugulies, {Reiner Ernst} and Madsen, {Ida E H} and Nielsen, {Maj Britt D} and Olsen, {Lis R} and Mortensen, {Erik L} and Per Bech",
note = "Keywords: Adult; Anxiety; Denmark; Female; Humans; Male; Mental Disorders; Middle Aged; Occupational Exposure; Questionnaires; Social Class; Stress, Psychological; Workplace; Young Adult",
year = "2010",
doi = "10.1007/s00420-009-0492-8",
language = "English",
volume = "83",
pages = "625--9",
journal = "International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health",
issn = "0340-0131",
publisher = "Springer",
number = "6",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Occupational position and its relation to mental distress in a random sample of Danish residents

AU - Rugulies, Reiner Ernst

AU - Madsen, Ida E H

AU - Nielsen, Maj Britt D

AU - Olsen, Lis R

AU - Mortensen, Erik L

AU - Bech, Per

N1 - Keywords: Adult; Anxiety; Denmark; Female; Humans; Male; Mental Disorders; Middle Aged; Occupational Exposure; Questionnaires; Social Class; Stress, Psychological; Workplace; Young Adult

PY - 2010

Y1 - 2010

N2 - PURPOSE: To analyze the distribution of depressive, anxiety, and somatization symptoms across different occupational positions in a random sample of Danish residents. METHODS: The study sample consisted of 591 Danish residents (50% women), aged 20-65, drawn from an age- and gender-stratified random sample of the Danish population. Participants filled out a survey that included the 92 item version of the Hopkins Symptom Checklist (SCL-92). We categorized occupational position into seven groups: high- and low-grade non-manual workers, skilled and unskilled manual workers, high- and low-grade self-employed, and unemployed. RESULTS: Compared to the reference group of high-grade non-manual workers, the depressive symptom score was statistically significantly elevated among unskilled manual workers (P = 0.043) and the unemployed (P < 0.001), after adjustment for age, gender, cohabitation, life events, and low household income. The anxiety symptom score was elevated only among the unemployed (P = 0.004). The somatization symptom score was elevated among unskilled manual workers (P = 0.002), the low-grade self-employed (P = 0.023), and the unemployed (P = 0.001). When we analyzed caseness of severe symptoms, we found that unskilled manual workers (OR = 3.27, 95% CI = 1.06-10.04) and the unemployed (OR = 6.20, 95% CI = 1.98-19.42) had a higher prevalence of severe depressive symptoms, compared to the reference group of high-grade non-manual workers. The unemployed also had a higher prevalence of severe somatization symptoms (OR = 6.28, 95% CI = 1.39-28.46). CONCLUSIONS: Unskilled manual workers, the unemployed, and, to a lesser extent, the low-grade self-employed showed an increased level of mental distress. Activities to promote mental health in the Danish population should be directed toward these groups.

AB - PURPOSE: To analyze the distribution of depressive, anxiety, and somatization symptoms across different occupational positions in a random sample of Danish residents. METHODS: The study sample consisted of 591 Danish residents (50% women), aged 20-65, drawn from an age- and gender-stratified random sample of the Danish population. Participants filled out a survey that included the 92 item version of the Hopkins Symptom Checklist (SCL-92). We categorized occupational position into seven groups: high- and low-grade non-manual workers, skilled and unskilled manual workers, high- and low-grade self-employed, and unemployed. RESULTS: Compared to the reference group of high-grade non-manual workers, the depressive symptom score was statistically significantly elevated among unskilled manual workers (P = 0.043) and the unemployed (P < 0.001), after adjustment for age, gender, cohabitation, life events, and low household income. The anxiety symptom score was elevated only among the unemployed (P = 0.004). The somatization symptom score was elevated among unskilled manual workers (P = 0.002), the low-grade self-employed (P = 0.023), and the unemployed (P = 0.001). When we analyzed caseness of severe symptoms, we found that unskilled manual workers (OR = 3.27, 95% CI = 1.06-10.04) and the unemployed (OR = 6.20, 95% CI = 1.98-19.42) had a higher prevalence of severe depressive symptoms, compared to the reference group of high-grade non-manual workers. The unemployed also had a higher prevalence of severe somatization symptoms (OR = 6.28, 95% CI = 1.39-28.46). CONCLUSIONS: Unskilled manual workers, the unemployed, and, to a lesser extent, the low-grade self-employed showed an increased level of mental distress. Activities to promote mental health in the Danish population should be directed toward these groups.

U2 - 10.1007/s00420-009-0492-8

DO - 10.1007/s00420-009-0492-8

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 19949958

VL - 83

SP - 625

EP - 629

JO - International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health

JF - International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health

SN - 0340-0131

IS - 6

ER -

ID: 23373070