Searching for longevity hotspots in Denmark

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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Searching for longevity hotspots in Denmark. / Hansen, Anne Vinkel; Mortensen, Laust Hvas; Westendorp, Rudi.

In: Aging, Vol. 10, No. 10, 2018, p. 2684-2694.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Hansen, AV, Mortensen, LH & Westendorp, R 2018, 'Searching for longevity hotspots in Denmark', Aging, vol. 10, no. 10, pp. 2684-2694. https://doi.org/10.18632/aging.101579

APA

Hansen, A. V., Mortensen, L. H., & Westendorp, R. (2018). Searching for longevity hotspots in Denmark. Aging, 10(10), 2684-2694. https://doi.org/10.18632/aging.101579

Vancouver

Hansen AV, Mortensen LH, Westendorp R. Searching for longevity hotspots in Denmark. Aging. 2018;10(10):2684-2694. https://doi.org/10.18632/aging.101579

Author

Hansen, Anne Vinkel ; Mortensen, Laust Hvas ; Westendorp, Rudi. / Searching for longevity hotspots in Denmark. In: Aging. 2018 ; Vol. 10, No. 10. pp. 2684-2694.

Bibtex

@article{53d42ce2fc7e4569a91cdd2b51435619,
title = "Searching for longevity hotspots in Denmark",
abstract = "While existing research on regions with high prevalence of centenarians has focused on selected candidate geographical regions, we explore the existence of hotspots in the whole of Denmark.We performed a Kulldorff spatial scan, searching for regions of birth, and of residence at age 71, where an increased percentage of the cohort born 1906-1915 became centenarians. We then compared mortality hazards for these regions to the rest of the country.We found a birth hotspot of 222 centenarians, 1.37 times more than expected, centered on a group of rural islands. Lower mortality hazards from age 71 onwards were confined to those born within the hotspot and persisted over a period of at least 30 years. At age 71, we found two residence-based hotspots of 348 respectively 238 centenarians, 1.46 and 1.44 times the expected numbers. One hotspot, located in high-income suburbs of the Danish capital, seems driven by selective in-migration of low-mortality individuals. The other hotspot seems driven by selective migration and lower morality among those born and residing in the hotspot.Thus, Danish centenarian hotspots do exist. The locations and interpretation depend on whether we look at place of birth or of residence late in life.",
author = "Hansen, {Anne Vinkel} and Mortensen, {Laust Hvas} and Rudi Westendorp",
year = "2018",
doi = "10.18632/aging.101579",
language = "English",
volume = "10",
pages = "2684--2694",
journal = "Aging",
issn = "1945-4589",
publisher = "Impact Journals LLC",
number = "10",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Searching for longevity hotspots in Denmark

AU - Hansen, Anne Vinkel

AU - Mortensen, Laust Hvas

AU - Westendorp, Rudi

PY - 2018

Y1 - 2018

N2 - While existing research on regions with high prevalence of centenarians has focused on selected candidate geographical regions, we explore the existence of hotspots in the whole of Denmark.We performed a Kulldorff spatial scan, searching for regions of birth, and of residence at age 71, where an increased percentage of the cohort born 1906-1915 became centenarians. We then compared mortality hazards for these regions to the rest of the country.We found a birth hotspot of 222 centenarians, 1.37 times more than expected, centered on a group of rural islands. Lower mortality hazards from age 71 onwards were confined to those born within the hotspot and persisted over a period of at least 30 years. At age 71, we found two residence-based hotspots of 348 respectively 238 centenarians, 1.46 and 1.44 times the expected numbers. One hotspot, located in high-income suburbs of the Danish capital, seems driven by selective in-migration of low-mortality individuals. The other hotspot seems driven by selective migration and lower morality among those born and residing in the hotspot.Thus, Danish centenarian hotspots do exist. The locations and interpretation depend on whether we look at place of birth or of residence late in life.

AB - While existing research on regions with high prevalence of centenarians has focused on selected candidate geographical regions, we explore the existence of hotspots in the whole of Denmark.We performed a Kulldorff spatial scan, searching for regions of birth, and of residence at age 71, where an increased percentage of the cohort born 1906-1915 became centenarians. We then compared mortality hazards for these regions to the rest of the country.We found a birth hotspot of 222 centenarians, 1.37 times more than expected, centered on a group of rural islands. Lower mortality hazards from age 71 onwards were confined to those born within the hotspot and persisted over a period of at least 30 years. At age 71, we found two residence-based hotspots of 348 respectively 238 centenarians, 1.46 and 1.44 times the expected numbers. One hotspot, located in high-income suburbs of the Danish capital, seems driven by selective in-migration of low-mortality individuals. The other hotspot seems driven by selective migration and lower morality among those born and residing in the hotspot.Thus, Danish centenarian hotspots do exist. The locations and interpretation depend on whether we look at place of birth or of residence late in life.

U2 - 10.18632/aging.101579

DO - 10.18632/aging.101579

M3 - Journal article

VL - 10

SP - 2684

EP - 2694

JO - Aging

JF - Aging

SN - 1945-4589

IS - 10

ER -

ID: 210838960