Self-Disorders in Asperger Syndrome Compared to Schizotypal Disorder: A Clinical Study

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Standard

Self-Disorders in Asperger Syndrome Compared to Schizotypal Disorder : A Clinical Study. / Nilsson, Maria; Arnfred, Sidse; Carlsson, Jessica; Nylander, Lena; Pedersen, Lennart; Mortensen, Erik Lykke; Handest, Peter.

In: Schizophrenia Bulletin, Vol. 46, No. 1, 2020, p. 121-129.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Nilsson, M, Arnfred, S, Carlsson, J, Nylander, L, Pedersen, L, Mortensen, EL & Handest, P 2020, 'Self-Disorders in Asperger Syndrome Compared to Schizotypal Disorder: A Clinical Study', Schizophrenia Bulletin, vol. 46, no. 1, pp. 121-129. https://doi.org/10.1093/schbul/sbz036

APA

Nilsson, M., Arnfred, S., Carlsson, J., Nylander, L., Pedersen, L., Mortensen, E. L., & Handest, P. (2020). Self-Disorders in Asperger Syndrome Compared to Schizotypal Disorder: A Clinical Study. Schizophrenia Bulletin, 46(1), 121-129. https://doi.org/10.1093/schbul/sbz036

Vancouver

Nilsson M, Arnfred S, Carlsson J, Nylander L, Pedersen L, Mortensen EL et al. Self-Disorders in Asperger Syndrome Compared to Schizotypal Disorder: A Clinical Study. Schizophrenia Bulletin. 2020;46(1):121-129. https://doi.org/10.1093/schbul/sbz036

Author

Nilsson, Maria ; Arnfred, Sidse ; Carlsson, Jessica ; Nylander, Lena ; Pedersen, Lennart ; Mortensen, Erik Lykke ; Handest, Peter. / Self-Disorders in Asperger Syndrome Compared to Schizotypal Disorder : A Clinical Study. In: Schizophrenia Bulletin. 2020 ; Vol. 46, No. 1. pp. 121-129.

Bibtex

@article{653233729f344b35857d4fb556767831,
title = "Self-Disorders in Asperger Syndrome Compared to Schizotypal Disorder: A Clinical Study",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE: There are historical and theoretical indications of a difference in subjective experience between autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and the schizophrenia spectrum. However, this difference has not been empirically explored. Therefore, to explore potential differences in subjective experience between the 2 spectra, we examined the presence/absence of self-disorders in Asperger syndrome/autism spectrum disorder (As/ASD) compared to schizotypal disorder (Sd). Self-disorders represent changes in basic self-awareness which have been found to accumulate within the schizophrenia spectrum.METHODS: All participants were recruited from clinical units and interviewed with a focus on the exploration of presence/absence of self-disorders, with the Examination of Anomalous Self-Experience (EASE) scale, and a general assessment of present psychopathology, with Schedules for Clinical Assessment in Neuropsychiatry (SCAN).RESULTS: A total of 51 participants (As/ASD, n = 22; Sd, n = 29) were included in the statistical analyses. When controlling for age, gender, years of education, mental problems before the age of 16, and special needs school attendance, there was a clear difference in presence/absence of self-disorders between the 2 groups, with significantly higher levels in the Sd group. Further, there was an overlap in SCAN-rated symptoms between the 2 groups.CONCLUSION: Our results indicate a significant difference between As/ASD and Sd at the level of the basic self, which, in turn, indicates that an exploration of anomalous self-experience is a valuable supplement in the clinical differentiation between As/ASD and Sd.",
author = "Maria Nilsson and Sidse Arnfred and Jessica Carlsson and Lena Nylander and Lennart Pedersen and Mortensen, {Erik Lykke} and Peter Handest",
note = "{\circledC} The Author(s) 2019. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center.",
year = "2020",
doi = "10.1093/schbul/sbz036",
language = "English",
volume = "46",
pages = "121--129",
journal = "Schizophrenia Bulletin",
issn = "0586-7614",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Self-Disorders in Asperger Syndrome Compared to Schizotypal Disorder

T2 - A Clinical Study

AU - Nilsson, Maria

AU - Arnfred, Sidse

AU - Carlsson, Jessica

AU - Nylander, Lena

AU - Pedersen, Lennart

AU - Mortensen, Erik Lykke

AU - Handest, Peter

N1 - © The Author(s) 2019. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center.

PY - 2020

Y1 - 2020

N2 - OBJECTIVE: There are historical and theoretical indications of a difference in subjective experience between autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and the schizophrenia spectrum. However, this difference has not been empirically explored. Therefore, to explore potential differences in subjective experience between the 2 spectra, we examined the presence/absence of self-disorders in Asperger syndrome/autism spectrum disorder (As/ASD) compared to schizotypal disorder (Sd). Self-disorders represent changes in basic self-awareness which have been found to accumulate within the schizophrenia spectrum.METHODS: All participants were recruited from clinical units and interviewed with a focus on the exploration of presence/absence of self-disorders, with the Examination of Anomalous Self-Experience (EASE) scale, and a general assessment of present psychopathology, with Schedules for Clinical Assessment in Neuropsychiatry (SCAN).RESULTS: A total of 51 participants (As/ASD, n = 22; Sd, n = 29) were included in the statistical analyses. When controlling for age, gender, years of education, mental problems before the age of 16, and special needs school attendance, there was a clear difference in presence/absence of self-disorders between the 2 groups, with significantly higher levels in the Sd group. Further, there was an overlap in SCAN-rated symptoms between the 2 groups.CONCLUSION: Our results indicate a significant difference between As/ASD and Sd at the level of the basic self, which, in turn, indicates that an exploration of anomalous self-experience is a valuable supplement in the clinical differentiation between As/ASD and Sd.

AB - OBJECTIVE: There are historical and theoretical indications of a difference in subjective experience between autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and the schizophrenia spectrum. However, this difference has not been empirically explored. Therefore, to explore potential differences in subjective experience between the 2 spectra, we examined the presence/absence of self-disorders in Asperger syndrome/autism spectrum disorder (As/ASD) compared to schizotypal disorder (Sd). Self-disorders represent changes in basic self-awareness which have been found to accumulate within the schizophrenia spectrum.METHODS: All participants were recruited from clinical units and interviewed with a focus on the exploration of presence/absence of self-disorders, with the Examination of Anomalous Self-Experience (EASE) scale, and a general assessment of present psychopathology, with Schedules for Clinical Assessment in Neuropsychiatry (SCAN).RESULTS: A total of 51 participants (As/ASD, n = 22; Sd, n = 29) were included in the statistical analyses. When controlling for age, gender, years of education, mental problems before the age of 16, and special needs school attendance, there was a clear difference in presence/absence of self-disorders between the 2 groups, with significantly higher levels in the Sd group. Further, there was an overlap in SCAN-rated symptoms between the 2 groups.CONCLUSION: Our results indicate a significant difference between As/ASD and Sd at the level of the basic self, which, in turn, indicates that an exploration of anomalous self-experience is a valuable supplement in the clinical differentiation between As/ASD and Sd.

U2 - 10.1093/schbul/sbz036

DO - 10.1093/schbul/sbz036

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 31050761

VL - 46

SP - 121

EP - 129

JO - Schizophrenia Bulletin

JF - Schizophrenia Bulletin

SN - 0586-7614

IS - 1

ER -

ID: 234086985