Thrombotic stroke and myocardial infarction with hormonal contraception

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Thrombotic stroke and myocardial infarction with hormonal contraception. / Lidegaard, Øjvind; Løkkegaard, Ellen; Jensen, Aksel Karl Georg; Skovlund, Charlotte Wessel; Keiding, Niels.

In: New England Journal of Medicine, Vol. 366, No. 24, 14.06.2012, p. 2257-2266.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Lidegaard, Ø, Løkkegaard, E, Jensen, AKG, Skovlund, CW & Keiding, N 2012, 'Thrombotic stroke and myocardial infarction with hormonal contraception', New England Journal of Medicine, vol. 366, no. 24, pp. 2257-2266. https://doi.org/10.1056/NEJMoa1111840

APA

Lidegaard, Ø., Løkkegaard, E., Jensen, A. K. G., Skovlund, C. W., & Keiding, N. (2012). Thrombotic stroke and myocardial infarction with hormonal contraception. New England Journal of Medicine, 366(24), 2257-2266. https://doi.org/10.1056/NEJMoa1111840

Vancouver

Lidegaard Ø, Løkkegaard E, Jensen AKG, Skovlund CW, Keiding N. Thrombotic stroke and myocardial infarction with hormonal contraception. New England Journal of Medicine. 2012 Jun 14;366(24):2257-2266. https://doi.org/10.1056/NEJMoa1111840

Author

Lidegaard, Øjvind ; Løkkegaard, Ellen ; Jensen, Aksel Karl Georg ; Skovlund, Charlotte Wessel ; Keiding, Niels. / Thrombotic stroke and myocardial infarction with hormonal contraception. In: New England Journal of Medicine. 2012 ; Vol. 366, No. 24. pp. 2257-2266.

Bibtex

@article{a239480aa4e140d6af7bb8fffe8b7cc2,
title = "Thrombotic stroke and myocardial infarction with hormonal contraception",
abstract = "BACKGROUNDAlthough several studies have assessed the risk of venous thromboembolism with newer hormonal contraception, few have examined thrombotic stroke and myocardial infarction, and results have been conflicting.METHODSIn this 15-year Danish historical cohort study, we followed nonpregnant women, 15 to 49 years old, with no history of cardiovascular disease or cancer. Data on use of hormonal contraception, clinical end points, and potential confounders were obtained from four national registries.RESULTSA total of 1,626,158 women contributed 14,251,063 person-years of observation, during which 3311 thrombotic strokes (21.4 per 100,000 person-years) and 1725 myocardial infarctions (10.1 per 100,000 person-years) occurred. As compared with nonuse, current use of oral contraceptives that included ethinyl estradiol at a dose of 30 to 40 μg was associated with the following relative risks (and 95{\%} confidence intervals) for thrombotic stroke and myocardial infarction, according to progestin type: norethindrone, 2.2 (1.5 to 3.2) and 2.3 (1.3 to 3.9); levonorgestrel, 1.7 (1.4 to 2.0) and 2.0 (1.6 to 2.5); norgestimate, 1.5 (1.2 to 1.9) and 1.3 (0.9 to 1.9); desogestrel, 2.2 (1.8 to 2.7) and 2.1 (1.5 to 2.8); gestodene, 1.8 (1.6 to 2.0) and 1.9 (1.6 to 2.3); and drospirenone, 1.6 (1.2 to 2.2) and 1.7 (1.0 to 2.6), respectively. With ethinyl estradiol at a dose of 20 μg, the corresponding relative risks according to progestin type were as follows: desogestrel, 1.5 (1.3 to 1.9) and 1.6 (1.1 to 2.1); gestodene, 1.7 (1.4 to 2.1) and 1.2 (0.8 to 1.9); and drospirenone, 0.9 (0.2 to 3.5) and 0.0. For transdermal patches, the corresponding relative risks were 3.2 (0.8 to 12.6) and 0.0, and for a vaginal ring, 2.5 (1.4 to 4.4) and 2.1 (0.7 to 6.5).CONCLUSIONSAlthough the absolute risks of thrombotic stroke and myocardial infarction associated with the use of hormonal contraception were low, the risk was increased by a factor of 0.9 to 1.7 with oral contraceptives that included ethinyl estradiol at a dose of 20 μg and by a factor of 1.3 to 2.3 with those that included ethinyl estradiol at a dose of 30 to 40 μg, with relatively small differences in risk according to progestin type. (Funded by the Danish Heart Association.)",
author = "{\O}jvind Lidegaard and Ellen L{\o}kkegaard and Jensen, {Aksel Karl Georg} and Skovlund, {Charlotte Wessel} and Niels Keiding",
year = "2012",
month = "6",
day = "14",
doi = "10.1056/NEJMoa1111840",
language = "English",
volume = "366",
pages = "2257--2266",
journal = "New England Journal of Medicine",
issn = "0028-4793",
publisher = "Massachusetts Medical Society",
number = "24",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Thrombotic stroke and myocardial infarction with hormonal contraception

AU - Lidegaard, Øjvind

AU - Løkkegaard, Ellen

AU - Jensen, Aksel Karl Georg

AU - Skovlund, Charlotte Wessel

AU - Keiding, Niels

PY - 2012/6/14

Y1 - 2012/6/14

N2 - BACKGROUNDAlthough several studies have assessed the risk of venous thromboembolism with newer hormonal contraception, few have examined thrombotic stroke and myocardial infarction, and results have been conflicting.METHODSIn this 15-year Danish historical cohort study, we followed nonpregnant women, 15 to 49 years old, with no history of cardiovascular disease or cancer. Data on use of hormonal contraception, clinical end points, and potential confounders were obtained from four national registries.RESULTSA total of 1,626,158 women contributed 14,251,063 person-years of observation, during which 3311 thrombotic strokes (21.4 per 100,000 person-years) and 1725 myocardial infarctions (10.1 per 100,000 person-years) occurred. As compared with nonuse, current use of oral contraceptives that included ethinyl estradiol at a dose of 30 to 40 μg was associated with the following relative risks (and 95% confidence intervals) for thrombotic stroke and myocardial infarction, according to progestin type: norethindrone, 2.2 (1.5 to 3.2) and 2.3 (1.3 to 3.9); levonorgestrel, 1.7 (1.4 to 2.0) and 2.0 (1.6 to 2.5); norgestimate, 1.5 (1.2 to 1.9) and 1.3 (0.9 to 1.9); desogestrel, 2.2 (1.8 to 2.7) and 2.1 (1.5 to 2.8); gestodene, 1.8 (1.6 to 2.0) and 1.9 (1.6 to 2.3); and drospirenone, 1.6 (1.2 to 2.2) and 1.7 (1.0 to 2.6), respectively. With ethinyl estradiol at a dose of 20 μg, the corresponding relative risks according to progestin type were as follows: desogestrel, 1.5 (1.3 to 1.9) and 1.6 (1.1 to 2.1); gestodene, 1.7 (1.4 to 2.1) and 1.2 (0.8 to 1.9); and drospirenone, 0.9 (0.2 to 3.5) and 0.0. For transdermal patches, the corresponding relative risks were 3.2 (0.8 to 12.6) and 0.0, and for a vaginal ring, 2.5 (1.4 to 4.4) and 2.1 (0.7 to 6.5).CONCLUSIONSAlthough the absolute risks of thrombotic stroke and myocardial infarction associated with the use of hormonal contraception were low, the risk was increased by a factor of 0.9 to 1.7 with oral contraceptives that included ethinyl estradiol at a dose of 20 μg and by a factor of 1.3 to 2.3 with those that included ethinyl estradiol at a dose of 30 to 40 μg, with relatively small differences in risk according to progestin type. (Funded by the Danish Heart Association.)

AB - BACKGROUNDAlthough several studies have assessed the risk of venous thromboembolism with newer hormonal contraception, few have examined thrombotic stroke and myocardial infarction, and results have been conflicting.METHODSIn this 15-year Danish historical cohort study, we followed nonpregnant women, 15 to 49 years old, with no history of cardiovascular disease or cancer. Data on use of hormonal contraception, clinical end points, and potential confounders were obtained from four national registries.RESULTSA total of 1,626,158 women contributed 14,251,063 person-years of observation, during which 3311 thrombotic strokes (21.4 per 100,000 person-years) and 1725 myocardial infarctions (10.1 per 100,000 person-years) occurred. As compared with nonuse, current use of oral contraceptives that included ethinyl estradiol at a dose of 30 to 40 μg was associated with the following relative risks (and 95% confidence intervals) for thrombotic stroke and myocardial infarction, according to progestin type: norethindrone, 2.2 (1.5 to 3.2) and 2.3 (1.3 to 3.9); levonorgestrel, 1.7 (1.4 to 2.0) and 2.0 (1.6 to 2.5); norgestimate, 1.5 (1.2 to 1.9) and 1.3 (0.9 to 1.9); desogestrel, 2.2 (1.8 to 2.7) and 2.1 (1.5 to 2.8); gestodene, 1.8 (1.6 to 2.0) and 1.9 (1.6 to 2.3); and drospirenone, 1.6 (1.2 to 2.2) and 1.7 (1.0 to 2.6), respectively. With ethinyl estradiol at a dose of 20 μg, the corresponding relative risks according to progestin type were as follows: desogestrel, 1.5 (1.3 to 1.9) and 1.6 (1.1 to 2.1); gestodene, 1.7 (1.4 to 2.1) and 1.2 (0.8 to 1.9); and drospirenone, 0.9 (0.2 to 3.5) and 0.0. For transdermal patches, the corresponding relative risks were 3.2 (0.8 to 12.6) and 0.0, and for a vaginal ring, 2.5 (1.4 to 4.4) and 2.1 (0.7 to 6.5).CONCLUSIONSAlthough the absolute risks of thrombotic stroke and myocardial infarction associated with the use of hormonal contraception were low, the risk was increased by a factor of 0.9 to 1.7 with oral contraceptives that included ethinyl estradiol at a dose of 20 μg and by a factor of 1.3 to 2.3 with those that included ethinyl estradiol at a dose of 30 to 40 μg, with relatively small differences in risk according to progestin type. (Funded by the Danish Heart Association.)

UR - https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMc1208930?query=recirc_curatedRelated_article

U2 - 10.1056/NEJMoa1111840

DO - 10.1056/NEJMoa1111840

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 22693997

VL - 366

SP - 2257

EP - 2266

JO - New England Journal of Medicine

JF - New England Journal of Medicine

SN - 0028-4793

IS - 24

ER -

ID: 40175213