Biomarkers of oxidative stress and inflammation after wood smoke exposure in a reconstructed Viking Age house

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Standard

Biomarkers of oxidative stress and inflammation after wood smoke exposure in a reconstructed Viking Age house. / Jensen, Annie; Karottki, Dorina Gabriela; Christensen, Jannie Marie; Bønløkke, Jakob Hjort; Sigsgaard, Torben; Glasius, Marianne; Loft, Steffen; Møller, Peter.

In: Environmental and Molecular Mutagenesis, Vol. 55, No. 8, 10.2014, p. 652-61.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Jensen, A, Karottki, DG, Christensen, JM, Bønløkke, JH, Sigsgaard, T, Glasius, M, Loft, S & Møller, P 2014, 'Biomarkers of oxidative stress and inflammation after wood smoke exposure in a reconstructed Viking Age house', Environmental and Molecular Mutagenesis, vol. 55, no. 8, pp. 652-61. https://doi.org/10.1002/em.21877

APA

Jensen, A., Karottki, D. G., Christensen, J. M., Bønløkke, J. H., Sigsgaard, T., Glasius, M., ... Møller, P. (2014). Biomarkers of oxidative stress and inflammation after wood smoke exposure in a reconstructed Viking Age house. Environmental and Molecular Mutagenesis, 55(8), 652-61. https://doi.org/10.1002/em.21877

Vancouver

Jensen A, Karottki DG, Christensen JM, Bønløkke JH, Sigsgaard T, Glasius M et al. Biomarkers of oxidative stress and inflammation after wood smoke exposure in a reconstructed Viking Age house. Environmental and Molecular Mutagenesis. 2014 Oct;55(8):652-61. https://doi.org/10.1002/em.21877

Author

Jensen, Annie ; Karottki, Dorina Gabriela ; Christensen, Jannie Marie ; Bønløkke, Jakob Hjort ; Sigsgaard, Torben ; Glasius, Marianne ; Loft, Steffen ; Møller, Peter. / Biomarkers of oxidative stress and inflammation after wood smoke exposure in a reconstructed Viking Age house. In: Environmental and Molecular Mutagenesis. 2014 ; Vol. 55, No. 8. pp. 652-61.

Bibtex

@article{1781b34186bd4b65860262dce27cc674,
title = "Biomarkers of oxidative stress and inflammation after wood smoke exposure in a reconstructed Viking Age house",
abstract = "Exposure to particles from combustion of wood is associated with respiratory symptoms, whereas there is limited knowledge about systemic effects. We investigated effects on systemic inflammation, oxidative stress and DNA damage in humans who lived in a reconstructed Viking Age house, with indoor combustion of wood for heating and cooking. The subjects were exposed to high indoor concentrations of PM2.5 (700-3,600 µg/m(3)), CO (10.7-15.3 ppm) and NO2 (140-154 µg/m(3)) during a 1-week stay. Nevertheless, there were unaltered levels of genotoxicity, determined as DNA strand breaks and formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase and oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1 sensitive sites in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. There were also unaltered expression levels of OGG1, HMOX1, CCL2, IL8, and TNF levels in leukocytes. In serum, there were unaltered levels of C-reactive protein, IL6, IL8, TNF, lactate dehydrogenase, cholesterol, triglycerides, and high-density lipoproteins. The wood smoke exposure was associated with decreased serum levels of sICAM-1, and a tendency to decreased sVCAM-1 levels. There was a minor increase in the levels of circulating monocytes expressing CD31, whereas there were unaltered expression levels of CD11b, CD49d, and CD62L on monocytes after the stay in the house. In conclusion, even a high inhalation exposure to wood smoke was associated with limited systemic effects on markers of oxidative stress, DNA damage, inflammation, and monocyte activation.",
author = "Annie Jensen and Karottki, {Dorina Gabriela} and Christensen, {Jannie Marie} and B{\o}nl{\o}kke, {Jakob Hjort} and Torben Sigsgaard and Marianne Glasius and Steffen Loft and Peter M{\o}ller",
note = "{\circledC} 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.",
year = "2014",
month = "10",
doi = "10.1002/em.21877",
language = "English",
volume = "55",
pages = "652--61",
journal = "Environmental and Molecular Mutagenesis",
issn = "0893-6692",
publisher = "Wiley",
number = "8",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Biomarkers of oxidative stress and inflammation after wood smoke exposure in a reconstructed Viking Age house

AU - Jensen, Annie

AU - Karottki, Dorina Gabriela

AU - Christensen, Jannie Marie

AU - Bønløkke, Jakob Hjort

AU - Sigsgaard, Torben

AU - Glasius, Marianne

AU - Loft, Steffen

AU - Møller, Peter

N1 - © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

PY - 2014/10

Y1 - 2014/10

N2 - Exposure to particles from combustion of wood is associated with respiratory symptoms, whereas there is limited knowledge about systemic effects. We investigated effects on systemic inflammation, oxidative stress and DNA damage in humans who lived in a reconstructed Viking Age house, with indoor combustion of wood for heating and cooking. The subjects were exposed to high indoor concentrations of PM2.5 (700-3,600 µg/m(3)), CO (10.7-15.3 ppm) and NO2 (140-154 µg/m(3)) during a 1-week stay. Nevertheless, there were unaltered levels of genotoxicity, determined as DNA strand breaks and formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase and oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1 sensitive sites in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. There were also unaltered expression levels of OGG1, HMOX1, CCL2, IL8, and TNF levels in leukocytes. In serum, there were unaltered levels of C-reactive protein, IL6, IL8, TNF, lactate dehydrogenase, cholesterol, triglycerides, and high-density lipoproteins. The wood smoke exposure was associated with decreased serum levels of sICAM-1, and a tendency to decreased sVCAM-1 levels. There was a minor increase in the levels of circulating monocytes expressing CD31, whereas there were unaltered expression levels of CD11b, CD49d, and CD62L on monocytes after the stay in the house. In conclusion, even a high inhalation exposure to wood smoke was associated with limited systemic effects on markers of oxidative stress, DNA damage, inflammation, and monocyte activation.

AB - Exposure to particles from combustion of wood is associated with respiratory symptoms, whereas there is limited knowledge about systemic effects. We investigated effects on systemic inflammation, oxidative stress and DNA damage in humans who lived in a reconstructed Viking Age house, with indoor combustion of wood for heating and cooking. The subjects were exposed to high indoor concentrations of PM2.5 (700-3,600 µg/m(3)), CO (10.7-15.3 ppm) and NO2 (140-154 µg/m(3)) during a 1-week stay. Nevertheless, there were unaltered levels of genotoxicity, determined as DNA strand breaks and formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase and oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1 sensitive sites in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. There were also unaltered expression levels of OGG1, HMOX1, CCL2, IL8, and TNF levels in leukocytes. In serum, there were unaltered levels of C-reactive protein, IL6, IL8, TNF, lactate dehydrogenase, cholesterol, triglycerides, and high-density lipoproteins. The wood smoke exposure was associated with decreased serum levels of sICAM-1, and a tendency to decreased sVCAM-1 levels. There was a minor increase in the levels of circulating monocytes expressing CD31, whereas there were unaltered expression levels of CD11b, CD49d, and CD62L on monocytes after the stay in the house. In conclusion, even a high inhalation exposure to wood smoke was associated with limited systemic effects on markers of oxidative stress, DNA damage, inflammation, and monocyte activation.

U2 - 10.1002/em.21877

DO - 10.1002/em.21877

M3 - Journal article

VL - 55

SP - 652

EP - 661

JO - Environmental and Molecular Mutagenesis

JF - Environmental and Molecular Mutagenesis

SN - 0893-6692

IS - 8

ER -

ID: 132418075