Oxidative stress and inflammation generated DNA damage by exposure to air pollution particles

Research output: Contribution to journalReviewResearchpeer-review

Standard

Oxidative stress and inflammation generated DNA damage by exposure to air pollution particles. / Møller, Peter; Danielsen, Pernille Høgh; Karottki, Dorina Gabriela; Jantzen, Kim; Roursgaard, Martin; Klingberg, Henrik; Jensen, Ditte Marie; Christophersen, Daniel Vest; Hemmingsen, Jette Gjerke; Cao, Yi; Loft, Steffen.

In: Mutation Research - Reviews, Vol. 762, 2014, p. 133-166.

Research output: Contribution to journalReviewResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Møller, P, Danielsen, PH, Karottki, DG, Jantzen, K, Roursgaard, M, Klingberg, H, Jensen, DM, Christophersen, DV, Hemmingsen, JG, Cao, Y & Loft, S 2014, 'Oxidative stress and inflammation generated DNA damage by exposure to air pollution particles', Mutation Research - Reviews, vol. 762, pp. 133-166. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.mrrev.2014.09.001

APA

Møller, P., Danielsen, P. H., Karottki, D. G., Jantzen, K., Roursgaard, M., Klingberg, H., ... Loft, S. (2014). Oxidative stress and inflammation generated DNA damage by exposure to air pollution particles. Mutation Research - Reviews, 762, 133-166. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.mrrev.2014.09.001

Vancouver

Møller P, Danielsen PH, Karottki DG, Jantzen K, Roursgaard M, Klingberg H et al. Oxidative stress and inflammation generated DNA damage by exposure to air pollution particles. Mutation Research - Reviews. 2014;762:133-166. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.mrrev.2014.09.001

Author

Møller, Peter ; Danielsen, Pernille Høgh ; Karottki, Dorina Gabriela ; Jantzen, Kim ; Roursgaard, Martin ; Klingberg, Henrik ; Jensen, Ditte Marie ; Christophersen, Daniel Vest ; Hemmingsen, Jette Gjerke ; Cao, Yi ; Loft, Steffen. / Oxidative stress and inflammation generated DNA damage by exposure to air pollution particles. In: Mutation Research - Reviews. 2014 ; Vol. 762. pp. 133-166.

Bibtex

@article{77b3168ce46649bdbd084cd43be6bc97,
title = "Oxidative stress and inflammation generated DNA damage by exposure to air pollution particles",
abstract = "Generation of oxidatively damaged DNA by particulate matter (PM) is hypothesized to occur via production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and inflammation. We investigated this hypothesis by comparing ROS production, inflammation and oxidatively damaged DNA in different experimental systems investigating air pollution particles. There is substantial evidence indicating that exposure to air pollution particles was associated with elevated levels of oxidatively damaged nucleobases in circulating blood cells and urine from humans, which is supported by observations of elevated levels of genotoxicity in cultured cells exposed to similar PM. Inflammation is most pronounced in cultured cells and animal models, whereas an elevated level of oxidatively damaged DNA is more pronounced than inflammation in humans. There is non-congruent data showing corresponding variability in effect related to PM sampled at different locations (spatial variability), times (temporal variability) or particle size fraction across different experimental systems of acellular conditions, cultured cells, animals and humans. Nevertheless, there is substantial variation in the genotoxic, inflammation and oxidative stress potential of PM sampled at different locations or times. Small air pollution particles did not appear more hazardous than larger particles, which is consistent with the notion that constituents such as metals and organic compounds also are important determinants for PM-generated oxidative stress and inflammation. In addition, the results indicate that PM-mediated ROS production is involved in the generation of inflammation and activated inflammatory cells can increase their ROS production. The observations indicate that air pollution particles generate oxidatively damaged DNA by promoting a milieu of oxidative stress and inflammation.",
author = "Peter M{\o}ller and Danielsen, {Pernille H{\o}gh} and Karottki, {Dorina Gabriela} and Kim Jantzen and Martin Roursgaard and Henrik Klingberg and Jensen, {Ditte Marie} and Christophersen, {Daniel Vest} and Hemmingsen, {Jette Gjerke} and Yi Cao and Steffen Loft",
note = "Copyright {\circledC} 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.",
year = "2014",
doi = "10.1016/j.mrrev.2014.09.001",
language = "English",
volume = "762",
pages = "133--166",
journal = "Mutation Research - Reviews",
issn = "1383-5742",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Oxidative stress and inflammation generated DNA damage by exposure to air pollution particles

AU - Møller, Peter

AU - Danielsen, Pernille Høgh

AU - Karottki, Dorina Gabriela

AU - Jantzen, Kim

AU - Roursgaard, Martin

AU - Klingberg, Henrik

AU - Jensen, Ditte Marie

AU - Christophersen, Daniel Vest

AU - Hemmingsen, Jette Gjerke

AU - Cao, Yi

AU - Loft, Steffen

N1 - Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - Generation of oxidatively damaged DNA by particulate matter (PM) is hypothesized to occur via production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and inflammation. We investigated this hypothesis by comparing ROS production, inflammation and oxidatively damaged DNA in different experimental systems investigating air pollution particles. There is substantial evidence indicating that exposure to air pollution particles was associated with elevated levels of oxidatively damaged nucleobases in circulating blood cells and urine from humans, which is supported by observations of elevated levels of genotoxicity in cultured cells exposed to similar PM. Inflammation is most pronounced in cultured cells and animal models, whereas an elevated level of oxidatively damaged DNA is more pronounced than inflammation in humans. There is non-congruent data showing corresponding variability in effect related to PM sampled at different locations (spatial variability), times (temporal variability) or particle size fraction across different experimental systems of acellular conditions, cultured cells, animals and humans. Nevertheless, there is substantial variation in the genotoxic, inflammation and oxidative stress potential of PM sampled at different locations or times. Small air pollution particles did not appear more hazardous than larger particles, which is consistent with the notion that constituents such as metals and organic compounds also are important determinants for PM-generated oxidative stress and inflammation. In addition, the results indicate that PM-mediated ROS production is involved in the generation of inflammation and activated inflammatory cells can increase their ROS production. The observations indicate that air pollution particles generate oxidatively damaged DNA by promoting a milieu of oxidative stress and inflammation.

AB - Generation of oxidatively damaged DNA by particulate matter (PM) is hypothesized to occur via production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and inflammation. We investigated this hypothesis by comparing ROS production, inflammation and oxidatively damaged DNA in different experimental systems investigating air pollution particles. There is substantial evidence indicating that exposure to air pollution particles was associated with elevated levels of oxidatively damaged nucleobases in circulating blood cells and urine from humans, which is supported by observations of elevated levels of genotoxicity in cultured cells exposed to similar PM. Inflammation is most pronounced in cultured cells and animal models, whereas an elevated level of oxidatively damaged DNA is more pronounced than inflammation in humans. There is non-congruent data showing corresponding variability in effect related to PM sampled at different locations (spatial variability), times (temporal variability) or particle size fraction across different experimental systems of acellular conditions, cultured cells, animals and humans. Nevertheless, there is substantial variation in the genotoxic, inflammation and oxidative stress potential of PM sampled at different locations or times. Small air pollution particles did not appear more hazardous than larger particles, which is consistent with the notion that constituents such as metals and organic compounds also are important determinants for PM-generated oxidative stress and inflammation. In addition, the results indicate that PM-mediated ROS production is involved in the generation of inflammation and activated inflammatory cells can increase their ROS production. The observations indicate that air pollution particles generate oxidatively damaged DNA by promoting a milieu of oxidative stress and inflammation.

U2 - 10.1016/j.mrrev.2014.09.001

DO - 10.1016/j.mrrev.2014.09.001

M3 - Review

C2 - 25475422

VL - 762

SP - 133

EP - 166

JO - Mutation Research - Reviews

JF - Mutation Research - Reviews

SN - 1383-5742

ER -

ID: 128572761