Association of objectively measured occupational walking and standing still with low back pain: a cross-sectional study

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Camilla Munch Nielsen, Nidhi Gupta, Lisbeth E. Knudsen, Andreas Holtermann

Objectives: This cross-sectional study investigated the association of objectively measured walking and standing still time at work with low back pain (LBP) intensity among blue-collar workers.
Design: A cross-sectional study.
Methods: 187 workers attached two accelerometers for diurnal standing still and walking measurements, which were categorised using tertiles. Workers’ self-reported LBP intensity (scale 0–9) was categorised into low (0–5) and high pain (6–9).
Results: Of the 187 workers, 17% reported a high level of LBP. Results of the multi-adjusted logistic regression analysis demonstrated a negative association between walking and high LBP intensity (OR 0.24 CL 95% 0.07 to 0.79). The results between standing still and high LBP intensity were mixed and non-significant.
Conclusion: Blue-collar workers who walk more at work tend to have low LBP. These results should be verified using objective measures in a prospective design.

Practitioner Summary: Most studies on the association of occupational walking and standing still with LBP have used poor self-reported measures. This study investigated the association of objectively measured time spent walking and standing still at work with LBP among blue-collar workers. A significant negative association between walking and LBP was found. However, because of the cross-sectional design, these results should be further investigated in prospective studies.
Original languageEnglish
JournalErgonomics
Volume60
Issue number1
Pages (from-to)118-126
Number of pages9
ISSN0014-0139
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2017

ID: 167912140